Signs and signals

Signs

Paying attention to traffic signs helps you drive safely and efficiently. The 3 common types of traffic signs:

  • regulatory signs
  • warning signs
  • guide and information signs

Regulatory signs

You must obey the instructions on these signs.

Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.34.17 pm Stop - Stop and give way as required. If you turn at an intersection, give way to pedestrians crossing the road you are entering.
Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.34.21 pm Give way - Slow down, stop if necessary, and give way as required. If you turn at an intersection, give way to pedestrians crossing the road you are entering.
Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.34.24 pm Roundabout - Slow down or stop and give way to vehicles on the roundabout. Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.34.29 pm No U-turn - Do not make a U-turn on this length of road.
Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.34.35 pm Wrong way — go back - You are driving in the wrong direction on a one way road. Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.34.38 pm
No turns - Do not turn right, left or make a U-turn – you must only drive in the direction indicated.
Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.34.43 pm No left turn - Do not turn left. Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.34.46 pm Keep left - You must drive to the left of this sign.
Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.34.49 pm No right turn - Do not turn right or make a U-turn (unless there is a ‘U-turn permitted’ sign). Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.34.52 pm
Two way - Vehicles travel in both directions on this road.
Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.34.56 pm No entry - Do not drive onto the road beyond this sign. Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.35.01 pm One way - You must drive only in the direction indicated.
Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.35.36 pmScreen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.35.31 pm
No overtaking or passing - Overtaking or passing is not allowed from the NO OVERTAKING OR PASSING sign to:

  • a distance as indicated (NEXT…)
  • the end of the bridge
  • the end of a narrow length of road
  • an END NO OVERTAKING OR PASSING sign
 Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.35.42 pm Trucks and buses use low gear - Used on steep routes to limit truck and bus speeds without requiring the primary brake.
Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.35.47 pm Keep left unless overtaking - On a multi-lane road, you must not drive in the right lane unless overtaking, turning right, making a U-turn, avoiding an obstacle or driving in congested traffic.
Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.35.56 pm Do not drive faster than the speed shown. In poor conditions, it is safer to drive slower than the limit. Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.36.02 pm
Indicates the speed limit in the area you are about to enter.
Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.36.06 pm The previous speed limit has ended and the general default speed limit applies. Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.36.12 pm You are leaving the area speed limit and re-entering a general speed limit area.
Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.36.24 pm Some speed limit signs show the times they apply (e.g. school zones). School zones may have flashing lights to draw attention. Other variable speed limit signs have a changeable display, for example in tunnels. These signs seem similar to normal speed signs except they have illuminated white numerals surrounded by red lights on a black background. These signs may also be combined with road control signs to direct traffic.
Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.36.30 pm Shared zone - An area where pedestrians have total priority over all traffic. Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.36.33 pm
End shared zone- If there is no sign indicating a different speed limit, the default speed limit applies.

Warning signs

These signs warn you of hazards.

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Steep descent or steep downgrade Railway level crossing ahead Railway level crossing – flashing signal ahead Roundabout ahead GIVE WAY sign ahead
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STOP sign ahead Traffic lights ahead Side road intersection Crossroad intersection T-intersection ahead
Screen Shot 2016-02-04 at 3.49.46 pm Screen Shot 2016-02-04 at 3.49.52 pm Screen Shot 2016-02-04 at 3.49.56 pm Screen Shot 2016-02-04 at 3.50.07 pm Screen Shot 2016-02-04 at 3.50.10 pm
Divided road End divided road Road narrows Merging traffic
Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.40.20 pm Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.40.59 pm Screen Shot 2016-02-04 at 3.50.50 pm Screen Shot 2016-02-04 at 3.51.03 pm Screen Shot 2016-02-04 at 3.51.06 pm
Maximum safe speed in good conditions Beware of kangaroos One-lane bridge Arrows indicate direction of traffic Traffic travels in each direction
Screen Shot 2016-02-04 at 3.51.10 pm Screen Shot 2016-02-04 at 3.51.15 pm Screen Shot 2016-02-04 at 3.51.20 pm Screen Shot 2016-02-04 at 3.51.25 pm Screen Shot 2016-02-04 at 3.51.30 pm
Turn Reverse turns Curve Reverse curves Winding road
Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.39.57 pm Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.40.02 pm Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.40.05 pm Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.40.08 pm Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.40.12 pm
Sharp depression in road Water flows across road Raised area on road Road hump Advisory speed limit
Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.41.10 pm Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.40.25 pm Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.40.28 pm Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.40.31 pm Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.40.34 pm
Slippery road School Pedestrian crossing ahead Pedestrian crossing Children could be on the road
Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.40.54 pm Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.40.40 pm Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.40.43 pm Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.40.47 pm Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.40.49 pm
Trucks crossing or entering Children getting on and off buses School bus turning People on bicycles may be using the road Pedestrians may be using the road
Screen Shot 2016-02-04 at 3.50.41 pm Screen Shot 2016-02-04 at 3.50.46 pm Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.41.02 pm Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.41.05 pm Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.41.08 pm
Added lane Low clearance ahead Low-flying aircraft ahead Hazard ahead. Be prepared to act

Hazard markers

You must obey these signs that show the direction to take when driving past hazards.

Unidirectional hazard markers

 Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.41.41 pm Drive to the left of the hazard.
 Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.41.47 pm Drive to the right of the hazard.

Bidirectional hazard marker

Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.41.51 pm Driver either side of the hazard.

Width markers

These signs (normally in pairs) show the width of a bridge, stock grid crossing or narrow section of road.

Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.41.55 pm Drive to the right of the sign. Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.41.57 pm Drive to the left of the sign.

Guide and information signs

Provide information about safe road use, routes, directions, destinations and points of interest.

 Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.42.01 pm Form one lane - Form a single lane with other drivers.
 Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.42.04 pm Turn left at any time with care - This sign indicates the presence of a slip lane (a lane for left turning traffic separated from the rest of the road by an island).
 Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.42.06 pm Slow vehicles use left lane - Used at the beginning of a long or steep climb where a slow-moving vehicle may delay other vehicles.
 Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.42.10 pm No through road - The road indicated is a dead end.
 Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.42.12 pm Reduce speed now - Slow down from the motorway speed limit to the much slower speed limit on the next section of road.
Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.42.16 pm Services - The services shown (first aid, tourist information, caravan parks or meals) are available on the road ahead or on a side road.
Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.42.20 pm Local traffic only - The road past the sign is not intended for through traffic. May appear at the entrance to a local area or at detours where local traffic is allowed to enter the work area.
Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.42.23 pm Tourist drive information - Indicates a scenic drive that connects a number of tourist attractions.

Traffic lights

Traffic lights control traffic and pedestrians to improve safety and access to roads. Be prepared to react to a light as it is an offence to disobey a red or yellow traffic light.

Stop

Do not drive past the STOP line or traffic light at a red or yellow traffic light/arrow. The yellow light is the start of the red light, not the end of the green. You must STOP on a yellow light, unless it is unsafe (in which case you may proceed).

Drive with caution

A flashing yellow light/arrow means proceed with caution (give way) to avoid a collision.

Drive past the light

Drive through green traffic lights/arrows when clear.

Traffic lights showing a white B light

A bus, taxi, limousine, emergency vehicle or a bicycle, may drive through white B lights.

Turning right at traffic lights

If the light is green and oncoming vehicles are approaching, you should move into the intersection if safe. When a safe gap occurs, complete the turn. If no gap appears until the lights turn yellow or red, complete the turn on the yellow or red light.

Obeying lawful directions

Police officers and Department of Transport and Main Roads inspectors

These people may direct traffic with hand signals (overruling signs and traffic lights).

Screen Shot 2016-02-04 at 4.30.14 pm Screen Shot 2016-02-04 at 4.30.23 pm Screen Shot 2016-02-04 at 4.30.28 pm
Stop where indicated and wait Go as directed Stop

Traffic controllers

Traffic controllers direct traffic at worksites. Obey lawful directions or signals.

Screen Shot 2016-02-04 at 4.32.39 pm Screen Shot 2016-02-04 at 4.32.43 pm Screen Shot 2016-02-04 at 4.32.47 pm
Stop Go slow Go slow

Speed limits

Speed limit sign

A speed limit sign has a number in a circle showing the maximum speed in km/h for good conditions (do not exceed to overtake). A lower speed suits poor conditions.

Electronic variable speed limit signs respond in real time to the conditions (e.g. reduced speed for congestion or adverse weather). To indicate a change, the lights surrounding the limit flash. These signs help keep traffic flowing and minimise stop-start driving.

Learner and provisional licence holders

There are no reduced speed limits in Queensland for learner or provisional drivers, just drive according to the speed limit and conditions.

In a built-up area

You should drive at the default speed limit for built-up areas (50km/h), unless you pass a speed limit sign that shows a different limit. A built-up areas include residential, commercial and industrial areas where there are buildings on land next to the road, or street lighting, at intervals of not more than 100m for a distance of 500m. It includes the whole road (if less than 500m long).

Outside a built-up area

The default speed limit on a road outside a built-up area is 100km/h unless otherwise signed. Only drive at 110km/h if there is a speed limit sign. Vehicles over 12t GVM or buses over 5t GVM are restricted to 100km/h, regardless of any higher speed limit.

Specific speed zones

A speed zone is a road that has a specific speed limit. A speed zone is defined by a speed limit sign at the start and another showing a different speed limit at the end. If you turn into another road before you see the end sign, you should use the default speed limits until you see a speed sign. A speed limit on a length of road does not apply to roads leading off from that road.

Variable speed zones

A variable speed zone has different speed limits applying at different times as shown by special signs that may be electronically controlled (e.g. school zones). The maximum speed limit in a school zone is usually 40km/h or 60km/h as shown. This speed limit applies on school days between the hours shown (otherwise the last speed limit sign before the school zone applies). School zone hours and speed limits may differ, so read the sign. When an electronic sign is blank, follow the speed limit shown on static signs.

A variable speed limit zone may also be applied on a motorway, long bridge or in a tunnel. This will be shown through electronic variable speed limit signs and selected static signs.

Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.36.24 pm

 Warning sign with advisory speed limit

This sign tells you the recommended speed in good driving conditions through the curves ahead. It shows extra caution and reduced speed is needed temporarily.

Screen Shot 2016-02-04 at 4.55.42 pm

Making turns

Turning

Indicate long enough to tell other road users before you turn.

Left turns

  • If turning left, position your vehicle close to the left side of the road.
  • If there is a slip lane, turn from the slip lane.

When you turn left at an intersection from a multi-lane road, you must approach and enter the intersection from within the left lane unless:

  • there is a slip lane
  • there is an obstruction in the left lane
  • road markings allow the turn to be made from another lane
  • your vehicle is showing a DO NOT OVERTAKE TURNING VEHICLE sign

Turning left on a multi-lane road with traffic arrows.

Right turns

When turning right into a two-way road, keep left of the centre of the road you enter. Follow turn lines if marked.

When turning right from a one-way street, keep your vehicle close to the right side of the road and make the turn as indicated from the right lane or as marked.

Turning right at unmarked intersections

When you turn right from a two-way road at an unmarked intersection, pass to the right of the centre of the intersection unless turn lines indicate differently.

Tips – turning

When turning:

  • check your road position
  • check the road markings
  • check traffic signs
  • check the direction of traffic
  • obey give way rules
  • check the position of approaching traffic
  • give way to pedestrians crossing the road you are turning into
  • make sure your entry position is correct

U-turns

You can make a U-turn only if necessary and if:

  • you have a clear view of approaching traffic
  • you give way to all traffic and pedestrians including traffic facing STOP or GIVE WAY signs
  • you can make a U-turn without obstructing traffic
  • there are no signs or road markings prohibiting a U-turn (at traffic lights only make a U-turn if a sign states you can).

Turning across painted traffic islands

You may drive on or over a painted island surrounded by one continuous line for up to 50m to enter or leave the road or enter a turning lane that begins immediately after.

You must not drive on these islands if they are at merge points and separate vehicles travelling in the same direction or if the island creates a slip lane.

Roundabouts

Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.37.07 pm Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.34.24 pm
You are approaching a roundabout. Give way to all vehicles on the roundabout.
  • Indicate, if necessary, as you approach and enter.
  • Drive clockwise around the roundabout.
  • Follow road arrows and direction signs.
  • Drive within marked lanes.
  • Indicate to change lanes.
  • Indicate, if practical, before exiting.

Driving on a roundabout with marked lanes

To make a left turn at the roundabout:

  1. signal left as you approach and enter from the left marked lane or line of traffic
  2. give way to vehicles already on the roundabout
  3. drive in the direction allowed by arrows (if any)
  4. continue to signal left as you exit, turn off your indicator after exiting
To drive straight ahead at the roundabout:

  1. approach and enter the roundabout from the left or right lane
  2. give way to vehicles already on the roundabout
  3. drive in the direction allowed by arrows (if any)
  4. if practical, signal left as you exit, turn off your indicator after exiting
To make a right or U-turn at the roundabout:

  1. signal right as you enter and continue while on the roundabout
  2. approach and enter the roundabout from the right marked lane or line of traffic
  3. give way to vehicles already on the roundabout
  4. drive in the direction allowed by arrows (if any)
  5. if practical, signal left as you exit, turn off your indicator after exiting
  1. Left turn – Signal left on approach and continue to signal as you exit.
  2. Straight ahead (second left exit) – Signal not required on approach, but if practical, signal left as you exit (same for both lanes).
  3. Right turn – Signal right on approach and, if practical, signal left as you exit. (Same for 4).
 Screen Shot 2016-02-04 at 5.06.49 pm
Lane changes are permitted on roundabouts as long as they are legal and safe.
Only use the left lane to leave the roundabout halfway around or earlier (unless arrows indicate otherwise) - the path taken by vehicle 1 is illegal.
Cyclists may exit a roundabout from either lane but must give way from the left lane to vehicles exiting the roundabout.
Screen Shot 2016-02-04 at 5.06.58 pm

Giving way at roundabouts

At a roundabout you must give way to vehicles already on the roundabout.

Tips – roundabouts

Motorcyclists and cyclists can be hard to see - keep a special lookout. Watch out for large trucks as they may need more space to manoeuvre.

Indicating and signalling

You must signal your intention to:

  • stop or slow down (brake lights or hand signal)
  • turn right, move right or make a U-turn (indicators or hand signal)
  • turn left or move left (indicators only)

Signal for long enough to give sufficient warning (e.g. 5 seconds when moving from a parked position). Turn off your indicator after completing a manoeuvre.

If the continuing road at a T-intersection bends, you must indicate if you are turning off the continuing road and going straight ahead.

Screen Shot 2016-02-04 at 5.20.26 pm Vehicle must indicate left if the continuing road curves left. Screen Shot 2016-02-04 at 5.20.33 pm Vehicle must indicate right if the continuing road curves right.

Hand signals

There are two official hand signals.

Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.46.57 pm About to stop or slow down. Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.47.03 pm About to turn, move right or make a U-turn.

Hand signals are the only time a body part may be outside the vehicle. Do not use hand signals to tell drivers to overtake.

Using your horn

You may only use the horn to warn others of your approach or position.

Giving way

Give way means:

  • if stopped – remain stationary until it is safe to proceed
  • in any other case: slowdown and, if necessary, stop to avoid a collision.

Learn every give way rule before the written test as it is tested in detail. Give way rules are designed to allow road users to move predictably without the danger of a crash.

GIVE WAY and STOP

GIVE WAY and STOP signs are at intersections where care is needed because of limited visibility, or vehicles on the other road have priority. STOP lines (solid lines at intersections) and GIVE WAY lines (broken lines at intersections) have the same meaning as signs and are used in case a sign is missing (applies at railway crossings).

GIVE WAY signs

When you face a GIVE WAY sign/line, you must slow down or, if necessary, stop. You must then give way to vehicles approaching, entering or on the intersection. If you turn, you must also give way to pedestrians crossing the road you are entering. Do not drive past a GIVE WAY sign on a narrow section of road when a vehicle is approaching.

STOP signs

When you face a STOP sign/line, you must bring your vehicle to a complete stop just behind the line or where you have a clear view of the intersection before entering it (if no line). You must give way to vehicles approaching, entering or on the intersection. If you turn, you must also give way to pedestrians crossing the road you are entering.

Giving way at GIVE WAY and STOP signs

When two or more drivers face each other at STOP or GIVE WAY signs at an intersection, they must first give way to all other vehicles and any pedestrians on the road they are entering. They then apply the give way rules:

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Vehicle 1 must give way to vehicle 2 because vehicle 1 is turning right across vehicle 2’s path. Vehicle 2 must give way to vehicle 1 because it is turning right across vehicle 1’s path.

Giving way when changing lanes

When changing lanes, give way to the traffic in the lane you are moving to.

Giving way to the right

When you come to a crossroad intersection without signs or lines, give way to all vehicles on your right. You do not have to give way to vehicles:

  • coming from the opposite direction and turning right
  • making a U-turn

Giving way when merging

Screen Shot 2016-02-05 at 8.16.49 am Example 1 - When lines of traffic merge (no marked lines), give way to vehicles ahead. Vehicle B gives way to vehicle A. Screen Shot 2016-02-05 at 8.16.54 am Example 2 - If your lane comes to an end, you must give way to traffic in the lane you are moving to. Vehicle A gives way to vehicle B.

Giving way when making a U-turn

You must give way to all vehicles and pedestrians when you make a U-turn, including traffic facing STOP or GIVE WAY signs.

Giving way to emergency vehicles

Do everything practical to give way to an emergency vehicle sounding a siren or flashing lights.

Giving way to busesScreen Shot 2016-02-05 at 8.19.00 am

Give way to a bus with this sign on its right rear side, when in a built-up area with a speed limit of no more than 70km/h, if the bus is signalling to enter traffic from:

  • a bus stop bay
  • the shoulder of the road
  • the bus zone or bus stop

Giving way from a slip lane with or without a TURN LEFT AT ANY TIME WITH CARE sign at the intersection

When you drive from a slip lane, give way to all bicycles and pedestrians on the slip lane and all vehicles (except vehicles making a u-turn) on the road you are entering.

Giving way at a T-intersection

A T-intersection consists of two roads where one ends at the intersection with a second continuous road. If driving on the road that ends, give way to all vehicles on the road continuing through if they are approaching, entering or on the intersection.

If you are on the road that ends and a vehicle on the road continuing through faces a STOP or GIVE WAY sign, you do not have to give way.

Screen Shot 2016-02-05 at 8.21.27 amAt this T-intersection, the continuing road (marked with broken white lines) goes around a corner. If you are leaving the continuing road to go straight ahead, you must give way to a vehicle going around the corner on the continuing road.

Vehicle 1 is on a continuing road. Vehicle 2 is turning off the continuing road and must give way to oncoming vehicles travelling on the continuing road (vehicle 1).

Reversing

You may reverse only as far as reasonable and only when safe (including on driveways).

Giving way to pedestrians

Always give way to pedestrians crossing the road you are entering.

Giving way at pedestrian crossings

You must give way to pedestrians and cyclists on or entering a pedestrian/children’s crossing. A vehicle stopped to give way at a crossing must not be overtaken.

Giving way when turning right

If you are turning right into a multi-lane road from a single lane road, give way to oncoming vehicles turning left.

If you are turning right at an intersection, give way to oncoming vehicles if they are going straight through or turning left.

You don’t have to give way to a vehicle if it is:

  • oncoming and turning right
  • driving onto the road from a slip lane
  • making a U-turn
  • facing a STOP or GIVE WAY sign

You must give way if you are turning across the path of a vehicle.

Giving way when entering or leaving a road

Give way to all road users when leaving a property to enter a road, or entering a property from a road.

Giving way when there are multiple vehicles

When more than 2 vehicles are at an intersection - combine the give way rules.

Screen Shot 2016-02-05 at 8.34.49 am Vehicles 1 and 3 are not required to give way to any other vehicle. Vehicle 2 must give way to vehicle 3 coming on the right.
Screen Shot 2016-02-05 at 8.34.56 am Vehicle 1 must give way to vehicle 2 on the right. Vehicle 2 does not have to give way to any other vehicle. Vehicle 3 must give way to vehicle 1 on the right. Vehicles 2 and 3 aren’t required to give way to one another as their paths do not cross.

Giving way from a parked position

When driving out of a park, signal for at least 5 seconds and give way to other vehicles.

Giving way at a railway level crossing

Give way to trains at a GIVE WAY or STOP sign/line at a level crossing.

Giving way to horses

Give way when a person in charge of a hard to control horse gives a signal (raising a hand and pointing to the horse). Stop on the side of the road and turn off the engine. Remain stationary with the engine off until there is no chance noise or movement from your vehicle will further upset the horse.

Road markings

Lanes

Lane markings

There are 4 types of lane markings indicating where you must travel:

  • lane lines
  • dividing lines or centre lines
  • edge lines
  • arrows

Lane lines

Lane lines are usually broken. You can cross broken lines to turn or overtake. However, lane lines are continuous (unbroken) close to a controlled situation (e.g. traffic lights or a STOP sign). Do not cross continuous lane lines to turn or overtake (though they can be crossed to pass a cyclist). Motorcyclists may cross continuous lines when lane filtering.

Dividing lines or centre lines

You may cross a single broken dividing line to overtake, U-turn or enter/leave a road.

You may cross a single continuous dividing line to enter/leave a road, or pass a cyclist. Do not cross a single continuous dividing line to overtake or U-turn.

You may cross a dividing line that has a broken line to the left of a continuous line to overtake, U-turn or enter/leave a road.

You may cross a dividing line that has a continuous line to the left of a broken line to enter/leave a road, or pass a cyclist. You must not cross a continuous line to the left of a broken line to overtake or U-turn.

Entering/leaving a road includes turning into another road and private property.

Do not cross a dividing line that has two continuous lines (except to pass a cyclist).

Do not cross a dividing line that has a continuous line or a continuous line to the left of a broken line to U-turn.

Edge lines

Do not drive on or over a continuous white edge line unless:

  • driving a slow-moving vehicle
  • riding a bicycle
  • overtaking a vehicle turning right or making a U-turn from the centre of the road
  • driving a vehicle that is too wide or long to fit in the marked lane
  • riding a motorcycle on a road shoulder or in an emergency stopping lane

You can drive on or over a continuous white edge line for up to 100m only if:

  • turning at an intersection
  • entering or leaving the road
  • stopping at the side of the road

Note: A driver turning left from a multi-lane road must turn from the marked or slip lane.

Arrows

In a lane marked with arrows, drive only in the direction/s indicated.

Overhead lane control

Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.47.30 pmDo not travel in a lane marked with a red cross above it. A flashing red cross means you must leave the lane as soon as it is safe. A white, green or yellow arrow, or a speed limit sign above the lane, means you may drive in that lane.

A LANE CONTROLS END sign means you may use any lane after the sign even if there were red crosses showing previously.

Special purpose lanes

Some lanes are only for certain vehicles.

Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.47.34 pmBus lane

Only a bus, taxi, limousine, or bicycle can drive in a bus lane.

Transit lane

Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.47.36 pmDo not drive in a transit lane during the hours of operation (as shown) unless you have the minimum number of people specified (including the driver), or you are driving a bus, taxi or limousine, or riding a bicycle or motorcycle:

  • Transit lane T2 – must have at least 2 people in the vehicle.
  • Transit lane T3 – must have at least 3 people in the vehicle.

Bicycle laneScreen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.47.40 pm

Bicycle lanes are for cyclists. You may stop/park in a bicycle lane unless there are signs or road markings prohibiting it. Give way to bicycles when moving into a bicycle lane.

Exemptions for driving in special purpose lanes

You may drive in a bicycle lane for 50m and other special purpose lanes for 100m to:

  • enter or leave a road
  • overtake a vehicle turning right or making a U-turn from the centre of the road
  • enter a marked lane or line of traffic from the side of the road

Keeping left

Drive as close as practical to the left on a two-way road. You could be fined for driving in the far right lane on a multi-lane road with a speed limit over 80km/h unless:

  • overtaking
  • turning right
  • making a U-turn
  • avoiding an obstacle
  • an official traffic sign indicates you can
  • traffic is congested

Overtaking

Overtaking on the right

Overtake only if you have a clear view of approaching traffic and it is safe.

If you are being overtaken

When you are being overtaken do not speed up.

Follow these steps for safer overtaking

  1. Keep a safe following distance behind.
  2. Check ahead for approaching traffic.
  3. Check behind for other vehicles.
  4. Signal right to give sufficient warning.
  5. Accelerate and move right (do not exceed the speed limit).
  6. Turn off right indicator.
  7. Signal left when clear of the vehicle you are overtaking.
  8. Move back to the left lane as soon as it is safe.
  9. Turn off left indicator.

Overtaking more than one vehicle at a time increases your risk of a crash.

Overtaking on the left

You can overtake on the left if:

  • on a multi-lane road, the vehicle can be overtaken in a marked lane to the left
  • the vehicle is indicating to turn right or make a U-turn from the centre of the road
  • the vehicle is stationary and it is safe to do so
  • you are lane filtering or riding on a road shoulder or emergency stopping lane

You can overtake a vehicle on the left on a multi-lane road, if the vehicle is turning right or if the vehicle is stationary and it is safe.

Overtake correctly or the results could be fatal. Before overtaking, consider:

  • Is it necessary?
  • Could I wait?
  • Is it safe?
  • Is it legal?
  • What are the road markings?
  • What is my speed?

Overtaking or passing

NO OVERTAKING OR PASSING:Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.47.46 pmScreen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.47.51 pm

  • Do not drive past this sign when an oncoming vehicle is approaching.
  • Do not overtake after you have passed this sign.

NO OVERTAKING ON BRIDGE

Do not overtake any vehicle on a bridge where this sign appears.

Overtaking long vehicles

Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.47.54 pmUnless it is safe to do so, do not overtake a vehicle displaying a DO NOT OVERTAKE TURNING VEHICLE sign if it is signalling to turn left or right.

A long vehicle on a multi-lane road may use the left-hand lane or the marked lane next to the left lane to turn left. It’s the same for a right turn - they may use the right-hand lane or the marked lane next to the right lane.

Overtaking cyclists

Leave a safe distance between you and a cyclist when overtaking or passing.

Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.47.59 pmMotorway and highway driving

Motorways are divided roads designed for fast-moving vehicles.

For safety, slower vehicles and pedestrians are not allowed on these roads. Most motorway entrances list the vehicles not allowed on the road.

If you face the sign, WRONG WAY – GO BACK, as you enter a motorway, stop and reverse when safe – you’re on an exit ramp.Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.48.02 pm

On a motorway you must:

  • be prepared to give way to vehicles as you enter along the on-ramp
  • not stop, except in an emergency or if you break down. If you stop, use the emergency lane/bay and your hazard lights
  • not travel in the emergency lane
  • not make U-turns
  • not drive in the right-hand lane unless overtaking, avoiding an obstruction or travelling in congested traffic
  • check behind and signal before you overtake
  • signal long enough to give sufficient warning before you change lanes
  • enter the exit lane and slow to the signed speed when leaving the motorway

Tips – motorway driving

  • Plan your route before you enter a motorway.
  • When entering the motorway, look for a gap in the closest lane and build speed on the on-ramp so you enter at the speed of the traffic.
  • Watch for vehicles entering from an on-ramp and adjust your speed to allow them to enter.
  • Be in the correct lane as your exit approaches.
  • Continue to the next exit if you miss yours.

Hazardous localities

Roadwork sites

Roadworks ensure safe, efficient and convenient roads for everyone.

Roadwork signs

Roadwork signs are for safety and enforceable by law. Disobeying them means:

  • you are committing an offence (penalties = fines and demerit points)
  • you may be liable for damage caused to equipment and materials
  • insurance claims may be void
  • vehicles may be damaged by loose gravel
The ROADWORK AHEAD sign gives advance warning of sites. Be prepared for changed conditions and slow down if required.  Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.48.25 pm
The workers sign is a temporary warning, used only while applicable, that roadworkers are ahead on or adjacent to the travelled path. Drive with due care for your own and roadworkers’ safety.  Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.48.33 pm
This multi-message sign warns of sites, and imposes a speed limit.  Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.48.43 pm
This multi-message sign warns roadworkers are ahead on or adjacent to the road, and imposes a speed limit.  Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.48.49 pm
The SPEED LIMIT sign at roadworks creates a temporary speed zone that applies until the next speed limit sign. Screen Shot 2016-02-05 at 9.04.57 am 
The STOP/SLOW bat is used by a traffic controller.
STOP = stop a safe distance from the traffic controller and wait.
SLOW = proceed with caution.
 Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.48.59 pm
The TRAFFIC CONTROLLER AHEAD/PREPARE TO STOP sign warns that traffic may be required to stop ahead and is only used when a traffic controller is on duty.  Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.49.04 pm
The PREPARE TO STOP and SIGNALS AHEAD signs warn of temporary traffic signals.  Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.49.08 pm
Be prepared to obey the traffic signals ahead.  Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.49.17 pm
The STOP HERE ON RED SIGNAL sign indicates where to stop at a red light. There may or may not be a STOP line marked.  Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.49.21 pm
The TRAFFIC HAZARD AHEAD sign warns of unexpected hazards ahead in emergencies. Take care and drive to the conditions.  Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.49.24 pm
The SLIPPERY ROAD sign warns of hazardous road surface conditions. Take care and drive to the conditions.  Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.49.29 pm
The LOOSE STONES sign warns of hazardous road surface conditions. Take care and drive to the conditions.  Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.49.34 pm
The LANE STATUS signs warn that 1 or more lanes are closed ahead. Bars = closed lanes, arrows = open lanes.  Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.49.39 pm
The LINE MARKERS ON ROAD and SURVEYORS AHEAD signs warn that line markers or surveyors are working ahead on or adjacent to the road (only used while workers are in the area). Drive with care for your own and roadworkers’ safety. Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.49.42 pmScreen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.49.48 pm 
The ROAD PLANT AHEAD sign is used where machinery is working on the roadway. Take care and be prepared for plant being operated without any form of delineation or traffic control.  Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.49.55 pm
The ROAD WORK supplementary plate may be used with a SPEED RESTRICTION sign.  Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.49.59 pm
The END ROADWORK sign defines the end of a site. It does not cancel any previous speed limit - roadwork speed limits apply until the next speed sign.  Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.50.04 pm
This multi-message sign defines the end of a site and reinstates the speed limit.  Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.50.10 pm

Reduced speed limits through roadworks

  • Speeding vehicles threaten the safety of other drivers and roadworkers.
  • While under construction or repair, the road surface may not be safe at the normal speed.
  • Loose gravel may damage vehicles.
  • Road surfaces may be uneven.
  • Road lanes may have narrowed.
  • Roadworkers may not always be visible when working.
  • When roads are widened, kilometres of utilities (pipes, electrical and phone lines) have to be relocated, which takes time.
  • Some roadwork jobs are mobile (line markings, road patching and mowing) and reduced speed limits increase safety.

Railway level crossings

Disobeying road rules near railway crossings can be fatal as crashes here are generally more severe because trains are heavy and fast. Yellow painted cross-hatching at a level crossing is legally part of the crossing.

Stopping and giving way at a level crossing

You must stop at a STOP sign/line and give way to trains. You must give way at a GIVE WAY sign/line to any trains.

Entering or leaving a level crossing

Do not enter a level crossing if:

  • warning lights/bells or boom gates are operating
  • you can see or hear a train approaching
  • the road beyond the crossing is blocked

Get off the crossing as soon as you can do so safely.

At a level crossing where boom gates or flashing lights are not installed, extra care should be taken

  • Slow down, or stop if facing a STOP sign, look both ways and listen for trains.
  • Take care if sun, fog, vegetation or buildings obscure your view of the tracks.
  • If stopped for a train, don’t move until warning lights (if installed) have stopped flashing, and you have checked another train is not approaching.

Alcohol and drugs

Alcohol

Drink driving

Alcohol impairs your ability to drive and increases your crash risk by affecting your judgment, vision, coordination and reflexes. Do not drive if the level of alcohol in your blood is over the limit for the licence you hold or the vehicle you drive.

When you are over the alcohol limit

You will be over the limit if the concentration of alcohol in your blood is more than the relevant alcohol limit:

  • no alcohol limit – 0.00
  • general alcohol limit – 0.05
  • middle alcohol limit – 0.10
  • high alcohol limit – 0.15 (equal or greater than)

Police regularly carry out random breath tests to detect/deter drink drivers. Refusing to take a roadside breath test is an offence.

What your alcohol limit should be

Learner, provisional or probationary licence in charge of any vehicle 0.00 (zero)
If you do not hold a licence and you are in charge of any vehicle 0.00 (zero)
If you hold a restricted licence and you are in charge of any vehicle 0.00 (zero)
If you are a section 79E order driver and you are in charge of any vehicle 0.00 (zero)
If you are driving, or in charge of, a truck, bus, articulated motor vehicle, B-double, road train, vehicle carrying a placard load of dangerous goods, taxi, limousine, public passenger vehicle, specially constructed vehicle, tow truck, pilot or escort vehicle escorting an oversize vehicle, or a vehicle being used to give driver training 0.00 (zero)
If you hold a class RE licence and you are in charge of a motorcycle during the first year of holding your class RE provisional, probationary or open licence 0.00 (zero)
If you hold a class RE licence and are learning to ride a class R motorcycle under the authority of your RE provisional, probationary or open licence 0.00 (zero)
If you are an interlock driver for the Alcohol Ignition Interlock Program and you are in charge of any vehicle 0.00 (zero)
If you hold an open licence and you are in charge of any vehicle Below 0.05

If you drive when over your alcohol limit

You may be charged and, if convicted, face serious penalties:

  • your licence will be cancelled
  • you will be fined and may be jailed
  • you will be disqualified from holding/obtaining a further licence for a period
  • you may be required to comply with the Alcohol Ignition Interlock Program

If you crash when over your alcohol limit, comprehensive insurance will not apply and you will have to pay for damages. Compulsory Third Party insurance may be affected.

Tip – how to avoid drink driving

  • If you plan to drink - stay overnight or plan alternative travel (taxi, public transport, non-drinking driver).
  • Discourage people from driving when they’ve been drinking.
  • Nominate a non-drinking driver.
  • Serve non- and low-alcohol drinks. Let people ask for a refill rather than topping up so they can count drinks.
  • Do not mix drugs and alcohol.

Drink walking

Alcohol also impairs your ability to walk and judge traffic safely. It is not a safe alternative to drink driving. Avoid walking or driving. If you are walking while drunk:

  • Catch public transport, a courtesy bus, a taxi or get a lift with a sober driver.
  • Walk with sober friends - a group is more visible.
  • Walk on the footpath (not the road) and, if there isn’t one, walk along the edge facing oncoming traffic.
  • Cross at traffic lights, crossings or crosswalks (if none, cross under a streetlight).
  • Carry or wear something light/reflective to increase visibility.
Common myth
Walking when intoxicated is safe.
Truth
Around 17 intoxicated pedestrians are killed annually on Queensland roads.

Drugs and driving

Many drugs can impair your ability to drive (and increase crash risk) by affecting your vision, mood, judgment, muscle control, reflexes, coordination and level of alertness. Combining drugs with alcohol further increases the risk.

Over-the-counter and prescribed medications

Common myth
It is ok to drive after taking over-the-counter or prescription medication.
Truth
Many over-the-counter and prescription drugs (even in recommended doses) can reduce driving ability.
  • Ask your doctor or pharmacist if medication can impair your driving.
  • Avoid driving if you are taking medications that affect driving.
  • Read the consumer information and take note of the warning label.

Illegal drugs

  • Illegal drugs (e.g. cannabis, speed, ecstasy and heroin) can affect your driving.
  • Never drive if you have consumed illegal drugs.

Mix at your own risk

  • Mixing drugs, or mixing drugs and alcohol, can affect your ability driving.

If you are caught drug driving

If a police officer reasonably suspects that your driving is impaired by any drug, you may be required to provide blood for analysis, and you may be charged. Police conduct random roadside saliva tests for illegal drugs. There is no legal limit - if detected, you will be penalised. If you fail to provide a specimen or a drug is detected, you will be charged and, if convicted, face serious penalties:

  • your driver licence will be cancelled
  • you will be disqualified from holding/obtaining a further licence for a period
  • you will be fined and may be jailed

If you crash while under the influence of drugs, your comprehensive insurance cover will not apply and you will have to pay for any damage caused. Compulsory Third Party insurance may also be affected.

Heavy vehicles

Maximum vehicle dimensions

Height 4.3m (except as specified below)
4.6m (vehicles built to carry cattle, sheep, pigs or horses)
4.4m (double-decker bus)
4.6m (height of a multi-deck car carrier when loaded on the upper deck)
Length 12.5m (rigid vehicles)
18m (articulated bus)
19m (combination vehicles such as a rigid vehicle and trailer. Does not include B-doubles and road trains, which are covered by a Department of Transport and Main Roads guideline)
Width 2.5m (the maximum width of a vehicle does not include any anti-skid device mounted on wheels, central tyre inflation systems, lights, mirrors, reflectors, signalling devices and tyre pressure gauges)

Vehicles exceeding these dimensions are required to operate under specific guidelines.

Long vehicles

Only vehicles 7.5m or more in length (including a car towing a caravan) are allowed to show a DO NOT OVERTAKE TURNING VEHICLE sign. When displayed, these vehicles may turn left from, or partly from, the lane next to the left lane. These vehicles can also turn right from, or partly from, the lane next to the right lane.

If driving a long vehicle (7.5m or longer):

  • drive at least 60m behind another long vehicle in front of you, unless you are driving on a multi-lane road, on a length of road in a built-up area, or overtaking
  • if driving a road train, drive at least 200m behind another long vehicle in front.

Loading your vehicle

Failing to secure loads safely on a heavy vehicle risks injury to you and road users and a large damages bill. Correct positioning involves centering and evening the load so there is no tilt in any direction. The load of a heavy vehicle must not be more than the regulated mass for an axle, axle group, the vehicle’s GVM/GCM (whichever is the least), or the registered seating capacity. Vehicles with a 4.5t GVM or more must enter a weighbridge checking station (if open or directed by an authorised officer).

All loading must be fastened safely and correctly. If you are carrying iron, timber, piping or similar material, it should be parallel with the sides of the vehicle and fastened to not flap or sway. If you are carrying a loose load (gravel or quarry products), it must be loaded so that no part can fall or dislodge during transport. If you carry freight containers, be aware of container height differences. The safest way to secure containers is using twist locks. Freight containers transported by road must have a container weight declaration. Fully loaded, you should have a good view to the front, on both sides and behind (using mirrors).

Queensland law requires all loads to be restrained to the standards of the Load Restraint Guide which outlines the safety principles to be followed to ensure safe carriage of loads - all heavy vehicle drivers should have a copy.

Any part of a load that falls should be removed from the road as soon as possible.

Parking restrictions for heavy and long vehicles

Heavy (GVM of 4.5t or more) or long (7.5m or more in length) vehicles must not stop for more than 1 hour in built-up areas unless:

  • signs permit
  • you are actively dropping off or picking up goods
  • a local government law allows you to stop longer

Warning signs

If you are driving a vehicle that is required to display specific signs (e.g. ROAD TRAIN, LONG VEHICLE, OVERSIZE, OVERSIZE LOAD AHEAD or SLOW VEHICLE), always remove or cover any sign that is not applicable.

Speed limiters

Heavy vehicles over 12t GVM or buses over 5t GVM are restricted to a maximum speed of 100km/h (regardless of higher limits shown on signs). Speed limiters are compulsory for trucks:

  • over 12t GVM built after 1 July 1991
  • with engines up to 300hp (224kW)
  • with higher horsepower engines built after 1 January 1991

Buses over 14.5t GVM or prime movers are to be fitted with speed limiters if they were manufactured after 1987. Buses over 5t GVM and up to 14.5t GVM have speed limiters fitted from 1 July 1991.

If a vehicle is required to be speed limited, penalties apply for using or allowing others to use the vehicle without a properly functioning speed limiter.

A heavy vehicle caught in excess of 110km/h will be issued a defect notice. It will be required to comply with Australian Design Rule (ADR) 65/00 and will not be allowed to operate until all repairs or modifications have been completed and cleared.

Portable warning signs

A vehicle (including those with trailers) carrying a placard load of dangerous goods or weighing more than 12t must carry 3 portable triangular, red, reflective warning signs.

If the speed limit on the road is less than 80km/h

Display portable warning signs if your vehicle has broken down or has lost load, and your vehicle or load is not visible for 200m in all directions. 1 triangle should be placed:

  • between 50m and 150m in front of the vehicle
  • between 50m and 150m to the rear of the vehicle
  • to the side of the vehicle, or fallen load, in a position that gives sufficient warning

If the speed limit on the road is more than 80km/h

Display portable warning signs if your vehicle has broken down or has lost load, and your vehicle or load is not visible for 300m in all directions. 1 triangle should be placed:

  • between 200m and 250m in front of the vehicle
  • between 200m and 250m to the rear of the vehicle
  • to the side of the vehicle, or fallen load, in a position that gives sufficient warning

Driver fatigue

All drivers of the following vehicles must comply with fatigue management legislation:

  • heavy vehicles
  • a combination (with a GVM of more than 12t)
  • buses more than 4.5t (with a capacity of more than 12 adults, including driver)

Under the fatigue chain of responsibility provision, parties in the logistics chain must take all reasonable steps to ensure drivers don’t drive impaired by fatigue.

If you experience a sign of fatigue, rest until it is no longer present. They include:

  • lack of alertness
  • inability to concentrate
  • poor judgment or memory
  • making more mistakes than usual
  • changes to health or fitness
  • blurred vision
  • difficulty keeping eyes open
  • not feeling refreshed after sleep
  • excessive head nodding or yawning
  • needing more frequent naps than usual
  • reduced ability to recognise or respond to external stimuli
  • drowsiness or falling asleep (including micro sleeps)
  • mood changes, increased irritability or other changes to mental health

The national driver work diary

All drivers of fatigue regulated heavy vehicles must record work and rest times in their national driver work diary during any trip further than 100km(A) from their driver base.

When applying for a national work diary:

  • present your current licence and national driver work diary (if you have one)
  • complete the application form in the work diary in front of the issuing officer
  • pay the application fee

Standard hours

Time Work Rest
In any period of... A driver must not work for more than a maximum of... And must have the rest of that period off work with at least a minimum break of...
5.5 hours 5.25 hours 15 continuous minutes
8 hours 7.5 hours 30 minutes in 15 minute blocks
11 hours 10 hours 60 minutes in 15 minute blocks
24 hours 12 hours 7 continuous hours stationary(B)
7 days 72 hours 24 continuous hours stationary
14 days 144 hours 2 x night breaks(C) and 2 x night breaks taken on consecutive days

Basic fatigue management

Time Work Rest
In any period of... A driver must not work for more than a maximum of... And must have the rest of that period off work with at least a minimum break of...
6.25 hours 6 hours 15 continuous minutes
9 hours 8.5 hours 30 minutes in 15 minute blocks
12 hours 11 hours 60 minutes in 15 minute blocks
24 hours 14 hours 7 continuous hours stationary(B)
7 days 36 hours long/night(D)  
14 days 144 hours 24 continuous hours stationary taken after no more than 84 hours and 24 continuous hours stationary and 2 x night breaks(C) and 2 x night breaks taken on consecutive days

(A) Under the fatigue provisions in the HVNL drivers operating more than 100km from their base are required to carry and complete a national driver work diary
(B) Stationary rest time out of a regulated heavy vehicle or in an approved sleeper berth
(C) Night rest breaks are 7 continuous hours stationary rest time taken between 10pm on a day and 8am the next day (using the base time zone) or 24 continuous hours of stationary rest break
(D) Long/night is work time in excess of 12 hours in a 24-hour period or any work time between midnight and 6am (or the equivalent hours in the base time zone)

Advanced fatigue management

In any period of... Operating limits Work maximum outer limits Rest minimum outer limits
24 hours Operator to propose 16 hours in Queensland 15 hours in New South Wales or Victoria
14 days Operator to propose 154 hours 2 blocks of 7 hours continuous stationary rest taken between 10pm and 8am (night rest)
28 days Operator to propose 288 hours 4 periods of 24 hours continuous stationary rest

Advanced fatigue management requires accreditation under the National Heavy Vehicle Regulator.

Operating limits are used to guide schedules and driver rosters, accounting for foreseeable contingencies and reflecting the inherent fatigue risks (e.g. balancing night driving balanced against longer rest breaks). Outer limits represent when further work poses an unacceptable fatigue risk and cannot be exceeded. This limit is set nationally and based on fatigue experts and experience from current practices.

Fatigue offence demerit points and penalties

Fatigue offences attract demerit points and fines in excess of $5,500. Demerits apply to offences that impact driver safety (e.g. failing to record work/rest, providing false information, falsely claiming to be in an accreditation scheme).

All work diary pages must be legible, even when corrections occur. A page must be cancelled by drawing two parallel lines across it and writing the word ‘CANCELLED’ if it is difficult to read. The information should be rewritten on the next page.

Passenger transport

Public passenger services provide transport to the public for a fare and include a courtesy or community transport service.

Examples of public passenger transport services are:

  • school buses
  • taxis and limousines
  • tourist services
  • charter bus services
  • scheduled bus services

Public passenger transport drivers must hold a driver authorisation issued by the Department of Transport and Main Roads and the appropriate class of driver licence. Driver authorisation increases public confidence in public passenger services and aims to protect vulnerable members of the community (e.g. children) by ensuring drivers:

  • are suitable people regarding their need to provide for the safety of passengers, their property, and the public
  • conduct themselves reasonably
  • are responsible drivers and capable of safe vehicle operation
  • are aware of customer responsibilities
  • are held accountable for complying with standards

To be granted authorisation, you must hold and have held open driver licence continuously for at least 3 years. For general services, you must have held an Australian driver licence for at least 2 years of the continuous 3-year period. For taxi services, you must be at least 20 years old and have held an Australian driver licence for at least 1 year in the past 3 years.

You must also satisfy medical fitness requirements and driving/criminal history checks.

School buses

School buses operating outside an urban area must have flashing yellow warning lights on the front and rear of the bus that flash when children are picked up or set down.

Other rules and responsibilities

Use of lights

Your vehicle’s headlights, rear lights and rear number plate light must be on and visible at night or in hazardous weather conditions.

Driving lights are additional headlights only allowed while your headlights are on high beam. Fog lights can be switched on and off independent of any other light.

You may drive with high beams in a built-up area but must dip your headlights when:

  • an oncoming vehicle is within 200m
  • you are within 200m of the vehicle ahead

Fog lights can only be used in fog or hazardous weather conditions that reduce visibility (fines apply for inappropriate use).

Tips – headlights

  • At night, use high beams or slow down so that you have time to react.
  • Only wear tinted glasses at night when a specialist has prescribed them.
  • Keep left and look to the side if oncoming lights dazzle you. If unsafe, slow down and stop until the vehicle has passed.

Following distance

Drive at a sufficient distance behind vehicles so you can stop safely to avoid a collision.

Following other long vehicles

If your vehicle combined with a caravan or trailer is 7.5m or longer, it is a long vehicle. Leave at least 60m between your vehicle and another long vehicle on single-lane roads outside built-up areas.

If you tow a caravan in road train areas, leave at least 200m between your vehicle and another long vehicle. Driving too close can make it hard for others to overtake safely.

Towlines

A towline use to tow a car must be no more than 4m long.

Parking

Parking is regulated and enforced by local governments and Queensland Police.

How to park

Obey signs or line markings telling you how to park. If none, parallel park the left side of your vehicle as close as you can to the left side of the road in the direction of travel. In a one-way street, park on the left or right side of the road. Where parking spaces are marked, do not take up more than a single space, unless your vehicle is longer than the length of a space. Do not park closer than 1m to any other vehicle.

Parking signsScreen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.52.00 pm

Signs indicate where you can and cannot park. If these signs show hours or days, the directions apply during those times and there are no restrictions at other times. These signs may also restrict the types of vehicles in an area (e.g. no heavy vehicles).

Certain vehicles (e.g. local residents) may be excluded from a sign’s restrictions. The letter P alone means there is no time limit.

Regulated parkingScreen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.52.04 pm

Regulated parking means there is a parking time limit (shown by the number in front of the P - e.g. 2P = two-hour parking). Parking is free, except where there is a metered space and then it’s free outside the times shown.

There are different types of metered parking in Queensland, including:

  • single meters – located at the front of individual parks
  • multi-bays (up to 4 parks) – located on the footpath central to all parks
  • pay and display (up to 10 parks) – a machine near the parks dispenses coupons that must be displayed on your vehicle’s dashboard.

Follow meter instructions to operate. You must insert coins even if there are coins already in the meter. Some metered parks become clearways during peak hours so check signs before leaving your vehicle.

LOADING ZONESScreen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.52.07 pm

Do not stop in a loading zone, unless you are:

  • a bus dropping off/picking up passengers
  • a truck dropping off/picking up passengers or goods
  • a motor vehicle displaying a commercial vehicle identification label
  • any vehicle that is dropping off/picking up goods (no longer than 20 minutes)
  • any vehicle that is dropping off/picking up passengers (no longer than 2 minutes)

NO PARKINGScreen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.52.10 pm

Do not park in this area. You may pick up/set down passengers/goods for a maximum of 2 minutes (unless the sign indicates longer). Do not leave the vehicle unattended.

Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.52.14 pmNO STOPPING

Do not stop in this area unless obeying official direction (e.g. traffic lights).

CLEARWAY

VScreen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.52.16 pmehicles are not allowed to stop, though buses, taxis and limousines may pick up/set down passengers. The sign will show the hours of operation (usually peak-hour). Penalties include fines and having your vehicle towed.

Angle or centre parking

Only angle or centre park where permitted, at the angle shown by road markings, in the direction stated on the sign.

Enter and leave centre parking areas by driving forward (unless a sign indicates otherwise).

Leaving your vehicle

When you open a car door, check you won’t hit anyone.

Secure your vehicle if you are going to be more than 3m away. You must:

  • apply the parking brake
  • switch off the engine
  • remove the ignition key
  • lock the doors if possible
  • close the windows if possible (a 5cm or less gap is permitted)

If somebody over 16 remains with the vehicle, the doors need not be locked and the ignition key may be left. Never leave children younger than 16, or animals, unattended.

Disability parking

The Australian Disability Parking Permit provides national permits, eligibility criteria and minimum standards for parking concessions. The Australian Disability Parking Permit provides the following in Queensland:

  • parking in any parking bay provided for a person with a disability
  • parking in local government metered or regulated parking areas free of charge, where the time limit is:
    • less than 30 minutes, permit holders can park for 30 minutes
    • 30 minutes or more, permit holders can park for an unlimited time

Red permit holders are entitled to park in any off-street parking bay (regardless of the colour of the signage) situated in areas such as shopping centres. Red permit holders may use their permit interstate and must park according to the permit conditions.

Expired temporary permits are not valid nor eligible for renewal. If you continue to experience severe functional mobility impairment, make a new application for an Australian Disability Parking Permit.

Fines apply for misusing a permit or parking illegally in a disability parking space.

Prohibited parking places

You must not park or stop:

  • on a road with a yellow edge line
  • on a painted island
  • within 1m of another parked car
  • in a mail zone
  • in a loading zone (unless permitted)
  • in a bus zone
  • where you would have less than 3m of road between your car and the other side of the road, a vehicle parked on the other side of the road, or any continuous marked centre line or double lines
  • in a special purpose lane other than a bicycle lane
  • between the centre of the road and another vehicle already parked, except when centre parking
  • within 1m of a fire hydrant or fire plug indicator
  • in an emergency lane on a motorway (unless necessary for safety)
  • on a safety ramp or arrester bed (unless necessary for safety)

Unless there is an official sign saying you can, you must not park or stop:

  • less than 10m from an intersection without traffic lights
  • less than 20m from an intersection with traffic lights
  • less than 20m before and 10m after a children’s crossing (when CHILDREN CROSSING flags are displayed)
  • less than 20m before and 10m after a pedestrian crossing (unless signs allow)
  • less than 20m before and 10m after a bus stop
  • less than 20m from a level crossing
  • on the crest of a hill or curve outside a built-up area unless the rear of the vehicle is visible for at least 100m

Also, ensure your vehicle is not blocking or partly blocking:

  • an intersection
  • a footpath
  • a pedestrian crossing
  • a traffic light-controlled crossing
  • a railway level crossing
  • a bicycle path
  • a tunnel or underpass
  • a driveway or property entrance, except for up to 2 minutes when you are dropping off/picking up passengers/goods
  • vehicles moving from one road to another road, ferry, wharf or driveway

A vehicle with GVM of 4.5t or more, or is 7.5m or more in length, must not be parked in a built-up area for more than 1 hour (unless signs allow or you are actively engaged in dropping off/picking up goods).

Seatbelts and child restraints

Everyone in a vehicle must wear a fastened seatbelt at all times unless:

  • you are the driver and are reversing
  • you carry a current medical certificate (valid for up to 12 months) that states you cannot wear a seatbelt for medical reasons
  • you are required to get in and out of the vehicle frequently while engaged in door-to-door pick-up or delivery of goods, and you drive no more than 25km/h
  • the vehicle was originally manufactured without seatbelts and passengers are 7 years or older. Passengers under 7 are not permitted without a child restraint.

Under Queensland law, the driver is responsible for ensuring every passenger wears a correctly fitted child restraint or seatbelt. Passengers 16 years or older who fail to wear a seatbelt will be fined (in addition to the driver) and accumulate 3 demerit points.

Mobile phones

Using a mobile phone held in the hand is illegal when driving. This includes:

  • making/receiving calls
  • text messaging
  • holding the phone to or near the ear
  • turning the phone on or off and operating any other function of the phone

You must pull over and park to make/receive a call. If caught using a hand-held phone while driving, you will be fined and demerit points will be recorded.

Tips – mobile phones

You may use a hands-free mobile phone, CB radio or any other two-way radio when driving (unless a class C learner or a P1 licence holder under 25), however, use extreme care and attention so you are not distracted.

Animals

A driver must not have an animal in their lap while operating a vehicle. A person riding a motorcycle must not carry an animal between the rider and handlebars or between the rider’s arms.

Pets should not travel unrestrained in front or back seats. Pets can use carriers, special harnesses that attach to seatbelts, or be put in the back of station wagons when an Australian standard cargo barrier is present. Dogs should not ride unrestrained in the back of trucks/trailers - special restraints should be used to ensure their safety.

Rules for other road users

Cyclists

A bicycle is a legal vehicle and cyclists have the same rights and responsibilities as drivers. There are also some road rules for cyclists, they are legally required to:

  • wear an Australian Standard AS2063 or AS/NZS2063 helmet, correctly fitted and fastened (reduces the chances of suffering head injuries in a crash by 80%)
  • fit your bike with a warning device (e.g. bell) and at least 1 effective brake
  • obey all traffic signs and lights
  • keep at least 1 hand on the handlebars at all times
  • use hand signals when turning right
  • have a red reflector at the rear of your bike that can be seen for at least 50m. If riding at night, have a flashing or steady front white light and rear red light that can be seen for at least 200m
  • fasten any luggage safely
  • not double anyone unless the bicycle is designed to carry more than 1 person and each person wears a helmet
  • never ride in a bicycle lane towards oncoming traffic
  • stop before riding across a children’s or zebra crossing
  • give way to pedestrians on footpaths and shared use paths – keep to the left
  • never ride on the part of a separated footpath designed for pedestrians

You may ride across a pedestrian crossing at traffic lights. You may ride on roads and footpaths unless otherwise signed. Local governments may prohibit riding on specific footpaths in the area (identified by NO BICYCLE signs). When riding on roads without marked lanes, ride as near as practical to the far left. On a roundabout with no marked lanes, take up any part of the road to ensure your safety.

Do not ride closer than 2m to the rear of a moving vehicle for more than 200m. Two cyclists can legally ride beside each other only when no more than 1.5m apart. Another cyclist can overtake these cyclists. On multi-lane roads you can occupy any part of a lane and travel in the right lane when necessary (e.g. right turns).

A bicycle storage area (provided at traffic lights) has bicycle symbols painted on the road between two parallel stop lines. Special rules apply:

  • give way to any vehicle in the bicycle storage area
  • where there is a green or yellow light in front of the bicycle storage area, give way to any vehicle entering the area

As a cyclist, you can:

  • ride in bus lanes, transit lanes and bicycle storage areas
  • overtake a vehicle on the left, unless the vehicle is signalling and turning left
  • travel in the left lane of a multi-lane roundabout if exiting more than halfway around a roundabout (e.g. right turn), but you must give way to vehicles exiting the roundabout earlier

Penalties

If you are 17 or older and disobey road rules while riding, you may be given an infringement notice. You can be fined but cannot accumulate demerit points. You can be arrested for drink riding if under the influence of liquor or drugs.

Optional hook turn by a bicycle rider

You may turn right using a hook turn. To make the turn:

  1. Approach and enter the intersection from the far left side of the road.
  2. Move forward until you are on the far side of the road you are entering, keeping to the far left side of the intersection. Keep clear of any marked foot crossings and drivers turning left from the intersection.
  3. If there are traffic lights, wait until a green light before moving.
  4. If there are no traffic lights, give way to approaching drivers on the road you have just left, then move forward.

Obeying traffic lights

Stop

Do not ride past a red traffic light. You can cross if another traffic light you are facing shows a green WALK, walking pedestrian or bicycle symbol.

Stop if it is safe to do so

Do not ride past a yellow traffic light (unless you can’t stop safely). If you face a flashing yellow traffic light, use caution when you enter the road and follow give way rules.

Go

Ride past a green traffic light if safe.

Tips – cyclists

  • Check your bike’s tyres and brakes regularly.
  • Be courteous to motorists and ride in a predictable manner.
  • Light coloured clothing makes you more visible. At night, use lights/reflectors and wear reflective clothing or wrist and ankle bands to attract attention.

Motorised bicycles

A motorised bicycle has an auxiliary electric motor with a maximum output of 200W, or a pedalec as defined by the Vehicle Standard (Australian Design Rule - Definitions and Vehicle Categories) 2005 (Commonwealth). The pedals must be the primary source of power. Bicycles powered by internal combustion engines are illegal on Queensland roads. You do not require a driver licence to ride a motorised bicycle and they are exempt from registration and Compulsory Third Party (CTP) insurance. Motorised bicycles have the same rights, responsibilities, and road rules as bicycles.

Pedestrians

We are all pedestrians at some time. Pedestrians include people:

  • walking
  • using wheelchairs (including registered motorised wheelchairs that travel no faster than 10km/h) or personal mobility devices
  • on roller blades, skateboards, and other wheeled recreational devices

Staying safe

  • Always cross at the safest possible point (crossing, lights, refuge).
  • When crossing a road, STOP, LOOK for traffic, LISTEN for approaching cars and WAIT until there is a safe break before crossing.
  • Obey traffic signals.
  • Cross using the most direct route.
  • Allow yourself enough time to cross.
  • Always walk on the footpath or nature strip. If there isn’t one, walk close to the road’s edge, facing oncoming traffic.
  • Do not travel on a dedicated bicycle path, or on the part of a separated path designated for bicycles, unless you are in or pushing a wheelchair, or using a wheeled recreational device.

Tips – pedestrians

  • Take care if walking after drinking alcohol.
  • Always keep to the left when walking on a footpath.
  • Cross the road with a group, if possible (more visible).
  • Don’t expect drivers to see you at night. Carry or wear something light in colour and cross under a streetlight if there are no crossings, crosswalks or signals.

Motorised wheelchairs

  • Use footpaths at all times. If unavailable, travel close to the left-or right-hand side of the road. (Note: wheelchairs are less visible in traffic.)
  • Cross using the most direct route.
  • Pay attention to others’ safety.
  • Never use the device on a road in the same way as a car.
  • Motorised wheelchairs can be registered to an individual or an organisation.

Rollerblades, skateboards and other wheeled recreational devices

Extra rules apply to rollerblades, a skateboard or other wheeled recreational devices (and to children under 12 using a wheeled toy (e.g. pedal car, scooter or tricycle)).

  • Do not travel on a road where the speed limit is 50km/h or more.
  • Do not travel on roads with marked lanes or a white centre line or median strip.
  • Do not travel on a road at night (you may travel on a footpath and cross using the most direct route).
  • Do not use wheeled recreational devices where a sign prohibits.
  • Give way to cyclists on a bicycle or separated path.
  • Keep to the far left side when travelling on a road or footpath.
  • Give way to pedestrians on a footpath or shared path.
  • Check local council laws that may affect wheeled recreational devices.

Motorised foot scooters

A motorised foot scooter is a wheeled recreational device that has an electric motor of no more than 200W output attached. The manufacturer must certify that the output does not exceed 200W by attaching a plate to the motor or engraving it. You do not require a driver licence, and it is exempt from registration and CTP insurance. In addition to the rules for wheeled recreational devices:

  • you must wear an approved bicycle helmet
  • you cannot ride where there is a sign prohibiting their use

Pedestrians obeying traffic lights

Stop

Do not cross if you face a red DON’T WALK or illuminated red pedestrian symbol.

Walk

Cross with care if you face a green WALK or illuminated green pedestrian symbol.

Caution

If you face a flashing red DON’T WALK or flashing red illuminated pedestrian signal, complete the crossing if started but do not start to cross.

Personal mobility devices

A personal mobility device (PMD) (e.g. Segway) is an electric device used for short distance transport. PMDs can be used on road-related areas such as footpaths, bike paths and shared paths around Queensland. A PMD operator must:

  • be aged 16 and over to be unsupervised
  • be supervised by an adult if aged between 12 and 15
  • wear an approved bicycle helmet
  • keep left and give way to pedestrians on paths
  • keep left to oncoming bicycles and PMDs on a path
  • have a working warning device (bell or horn)
  • have a working flashing or steady white light at the front, a red light and a red reflector at the rear to use at night or in hazardous conditions.

A PMD operator must not:Screen Shot 2016-01-26 at 2.53.02 pm

  • travel faster than 12km/h
  • travel along a road unless there is an obstruction or it is impractical which means they can travel up to 50m on the road (PMD users may stay on their device to cross a road at a designated crossing)
  • carry any passengers
  • use a hand-held mobile phone
  • drink alcohol
  • travel past a ‘PMD prohibited’ sign

Local councils and land owners can display this sign to prohibit PMDs in areas not appropriate for their use such as malls, esplanades or jetties.

 

Continue reading the Your Keys to Driving in Queensland Summary:

1. Introduction

2. Licences

3. Road Rules

4. Safe Road Use

5. Offences and Penalties

6. Your Vehicle

7. Organ Donation


Check out the other QLD Driving Test resources available to help you pass the written road rules test and get your learner licence (L plates):

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