Obligations of licence holders

The Queensland Government has introduced secure, durable and reliable licences, authorities and proof of age cards including:

  • Driver licence
  • Heavy vehicle driver licence
  • Proof of age card
  • Marine licence indicator
  • Industry authority

Applying for a card

Applying in person and providing additional information

To obtain a card, you must apply in person at a licence-issuing centre so you can have your photo and signature captured digitally.

Receiving your card

Cards are produced at a secure location and mailed to you within 14 days of your application. An interim Driver Licence Receipt will be issued and will act as proof you hold a licence until you receive your card in the mail.

It is illegal to try to bribe people. Penalties include fines and imprisonment.

Licence types

To drive legally, you must hold a current licence allowing you to drive that class of vehicle on a road in Queensland. Types of Queensland driver licences are:

  • Learner licence
  • Provisional licence
  • Probationary licence
  • Restricted licence
  • Open licence

Learner licence

You must hold a learner, provisional, probationary or open licence that allows you to drive a class of vehicle before learning to drive that class of vehicle.

Provisional licence

After holding your learner licence for 1 year, you may sit a Q-Safe practical driving test. Depending on your age when you pass, you will get either a P1 (red Ps) or P2 (green Ps) provisional licence, which must be held for a minimum period before progressing.

Probationary licence

A probationary licence is for people disqualified from holding or obtaining a licence by a court who have served their disqualification period.

Restricted licence

People convicted of drink driving who need a licence for work may be eligible to request the court for a restricted licence (also known as a ‘work’ licence).

Open licence

If you have held your provisional or probationary licence for the required period you may graduate to the open licence.

Graduated licensing system

Statistically, drivers aged 17-24 have the highest risk of being involved in crashes that result in death or injury. The Queensland graduated licensing system aims to give inexperienced drivers more supervised driving experience to decrease this risk.

Learner drivers aged 23 and under must complete six steps before the open licence:

  1. Written road rules test
  2. Learner licence
  3. Q-Safe practical driving test
  4. P1 provisional licence
  5. Hazard perception test
  6. P2 provisional licence

Open licence

If all steps are completed on time (starting with the written road rules test when you become eligible at 16) you may get your open licence when you are 20.

For a learner licence

A car learner licence can be obtained when you are over 16 and pass a written road rules test. Learner licences are issued for 3 years and you must hold your learner licence for 1 year (of the previous 3 years) to be eligible to take the Q-Safe practical driving test and progress to a provisional licence.

While learning to drive, at all times:

  • Your learner licence (or Driver Licence Receipt) must be with you.
  • L plates must be clearly displayed at the front and back of the vehicle.
  • You must be accompanied by a supervisor who has held an open licence for that class of vehicle for at least 1 year. Supervising drivers must not be on a provisional, probationary, restricted, suspended, cancelled or expired licence.

To progress to your P1 or P2 licence:

  • If you are under 25, you must complete and record 100 hours of supervised on-road driving (including at least 10 hours of night driving) in your logbook.
  • You must pass the Q-Safe practical driving test.

Learner licence restrictions include:

  • A zero (0.00) blood alcohol concentration (BAC)
  • A car supervising driver must have a BAC below 0.05
  • A heavy vehicle supervising driver must have a 0.00 BAC
  • Learners under 25, their supervisor and passengers have additional restrictions on mobile phone use
  • If you accrue 4 or more demerit points over a continuous 1 year period your learner licence will be suspended for 3 months

For a P1 provisional licence

A P1 provisional car licence can be obtained when you are over 17 and under 25, have held your learner licence for 1 year (of the previous 3 years) and pass the Q-Safe practical driving test. You must hold your P1 licence for 1 year to be eligible to take the Hazard Perception Test and progress to a P2 provisional or open licence.

While on your P1 licence, at all times:

  • Your P1 licence (or Driver Licence Receipt before it arrives) must be with you.
  • Red P plates must be clearly displayed at the front and back of your car.

P1 licence restrictions include:

  • A zero (0.00) BAC
  • If you accrue 4 or more demerit points over a continuous 1 year period you will have to choose a 3-month suspension or 1-year good driving behaviour period.
  • If your licence is suspended/cancelled or you are serving a good driving behaviour period, late night driving restrictions that prohibit you from driving between 11pm and 5am may apply.

Additional P1 licence restrictions for drivers under 25:

  • Mobile phone restrictions apply to you and your passengers.
  • Restrictions apply to driving high-powered vehicles (e.g. vehicles with 8 or more cylinders, and turbo, super-charged or modified engines).
  • Peer passenger restrictions apply.

For a P2 provisional licence

A P2 provisional car licence can be obtained when you are 18 or over.

  • If you are under 25, you must have held your P1 licence for at least 1 year and have passed the Hazard Perception Test.
  • If you are 25 or over, you must have held your learner licence for at least 1 year and passed your Q-Safe practical driving test.
  • If you got your P1 licence when you were under 23 and your P2 licence when you were under 25, you are required to hold your P2 licence for at least 2 years. In any other case you are required to hold your P2 licence for at least 1 year.

While on your P2 licence, at all times:

  • Your P2 licence (or Driver Licence Receipt before it arrives) must be with you.
  • Green P plates must be clearly displayed at the front and back of your car.

P2 licence restrictions include:

  • A zero (0.00) BAC.
  • If you accrue 4 or more demerit points over a continuous 1 year period you will have to choose a 3-month suspension or 1-year good driving behaviour period.
  • If your licence is suspended/cancelled or you are serving a good driving behaviour period late night driving restrictions that prohibit you from driving between 11pm and 5am may apply.

Additional P2 licence restrictions for drivers under 25:

  • Restrictions apply to driving high-powered vehicles (e.g. vehicles with 8 or more cylinders, and turbo, super-charged or modified engines).

For an open licence

You may only get your open licence if you are at least 20.

  • If you were under 23 when you got your P1 licence you must hold your P2 licence for at least 2 years to progress to an open licence.
  • If you were 23 when you got your P1 licence you must hold your P2 licence for at least 1 year to progress to an open licence.
  • If you were 24 when you got your P1 licence you must hold your P1 licence for at least 1 year to progress to an open licence.
  • If you were 25 or over when you passed your practical test, you would’ve been issued with a P2 licence which you must hold for at least 1 year. To progress to an open licence you are not required to undertake the Hazard Perception Test.

If you accrue 12 or more demerit points in a continuous 3 year period you will have to choose between a licence suspension or a 1 year good driving behaviour period.

Learner licence for motorcycle

Only drivers who have held their class C provisional, probationary or open licence for at least 1 year can apply for a class RE learner licence. On your motorcycle learner

  • An L plate must be displayed at the back of your motorcycle or on the back of a vest worn while riding.
  • You may only learn on a learner approved motorcycle.
  • You must always ride with a zero (0.00) BAC.
  • Restrictions apply to pillion passengers.

Minimum period for licence types

If you are required to hold your licence for a stated minimum period, any period during which your licence is expired, suspended (including State Penalties Enforcement Registry suspensions) or you are disqualified from holding a licence by a court will not count towards the stated period.

Returning drivers

If you previously held a class of licence that has not been valid for more than 5 years (e.g. expired, surrendered or cancelled), you may apply for that that class or a lower class of licence without the requirement to hold any other licence.

Licence classes, codes and conditions

Licence class determines the vehicles you can drive. Licences show only the highest class of authorised vehicle and the code for any required conditions. Motorcycle classes RE or R and class UD appear separately on licences.

Authority to learn

If you hold a provisional, probationary or open licence, you are authorised to learn in vehicles of that class with either an automatic or manual transmission or with a synchromesh gearbox and higher classes of vehicle (see table). When learning another class of vehicle, you must be accompanied by a person who has held an open licence for that class of vehicle for at least 1 year. Fines apply for driving unaccompanied or with a person not appropriately licensed. L plates must be displayed.

Driver licence classes

Licence class Class of vehicle
RE (motorcycle) You may ride a learner approved motorcycle:

  • that is a moped
  • other than a moped, with/without a trailer
R (motorcycle) You may ride a motorcycle:

  • of class RE
  • with unlimited engine size, with/without a trailer
C (car) You may drive a:

  • moped
  • car, with/without a trailer
  • vehicle no more than 4.5t gross vehicle mass (GVM), built or fitted to carry no more than 12 adults (including driver)
  • specially constructed vehicle with/without a trailer (not including mobile cranes of more than 4.5t GVM)

You may learn to drive a class LR, MR, or HR vehicle.

LR (light rigid) You may drive a:

  • class C vehicle
  • bus of no more than 8t GVM, with/without a trailer of no more than 9t GVM
  • truck (including a prime mover) of no more than 8t GVM, with/without a trailer of no more than 9t GVM

You may learn to drive a class MR, or HR vehicle.

MR (medium rigid) You may drive a:

  • class LR vehicle
  • bus of more than 8t GVM, with no more than 2 axles, with/without a trailer of no more than 9t GVM
  • truck (including a prime mover) of more than 8t GVM, with no more than 2 axles, with/without a trailer of no more than 9t GVM

You may learn to drive a class HR, or HC vehicle.

HR (heavy rigid) You may drive a:

  • class MR vehicle
  • bus of more than 8t GVM, with more than 2 axles, with/without a trailer of no more than 9t GVM
  • articulated bus
  • truck (including a prime mover) of more than 8t GVM, with more than 2 axles, with/without a trailer of no more than 9t GVM

You may learn to drive a class HC, or MC vehicle.

HC (heavy combination) You may drive a:

  • class HR vehicle
  • truck (including a prime mover) of more than 8t GVM, with a trailer of more than 9t GVM

You may learn to drive a class MC vehicle.

MC (multi-combination) You may drive a:

  • class HC vehicle
  • B-double
  • road train
UD You may drive a specially constructed vehicle, with or without a trailer. Note: From 1 January 2014 no new class UD licences will be issued. Mobile cranes of more than 4.5t GVM can be driven on a class UD until 1 January 2016.

Licence codes and conditions

Code Licence condition
A You may only drive the class of vehicle with automatic transmission.
B You may only drive the class of vehicle with synchromesh gearbox.
I You may only drive a nominated vehicle fitted with a prescribed interlock, or while carrying an interlock exemption certificate.
M You may only drive while carrying and obeying conditions listed on a current medical certificate form F3712.
RD You may learn to drive the classes of vehicle stated on your returning driver certificate (which must be carried at all times while learning).
S You may only drive while wearing corrective lenses.
V You may only drive while carrying a notice given by the chief executive that states the ways your vehicle is fitted, equipped or adapted with driver aids.
X1 You may only drive while carrying and obeying an order under section 87 or 88 of the Transport Operations (Road Use Management) Act 1995.
X3 You may only drive while carrying and obeying a special hardship order and any special hardship order variation order.
X4 You may only drive while carrying and obeying a section 79E order and any section 79E variation order.

Upgrading your licence

To upgrade your licence to another class, you must:

  • complete a Driver Licence Application/Renewal (form F3000) and produce your licence. You will be required to declare any suspensions, disqualifications or cancellations of your driver licence.
  • provide evidence of identity and residence (if required)
  • pass a written road rules test (if required). To pass the heavy vehicle test, you must answer 8 of 10 questions correctly. For the motorcycle test, you must answer 27 of 30 questions correctly
  • pay the Q-Safe driving test fee and pass the test (if required).

Minimum periods for licence classes

Licence class Minimum period
R (motorcycle) You must have held a class RE provisional, probationary or open licence for at least 1 year.
RE (motorcycle)
LR (light rigid)
MR (medium rigid)
You must have held a class C provisional, probationary or open licence for at least 1 year.
HR (heavy rigid) You must have held a provisional, probationary or open:

  • class C licence for at least 2 years.
  • class LR or MR licence for at least 1 year.
HC (heavy combination) You must have held a class MR or HR provisional, probationary or open licence for at least 1 year.
MC (multi-combination) You must have held a class HR or HC provisional, probationary or open licence for at least 1 year.

Applying for a licence

To apply for a licence you must:

  • visit a Department of Transport and Main Roads service centre, Queensland Government licence issuing office or, for rural areas, Queensland police station
  • complete a Driver Licence Application/Renewal (form F3000)
  • provide evidence of identity and Queensland residency
  • declare you are medically fit to drive or provide a medical certificate if you have a medical condition that may affect your ability to drive
  • pay the licence fee

You may be required to have your photo and signature taken digitally.

Learner licence

To apply, you will need to pay for and pass the road rules test (if required).

Provisional licence

To apply, you will need to have recorded 100 hours of supervised driving in a logbook and submit the logbook for assessment prior to your driving test (if required).

To move from a P1 to a P2 or open licence you will need to pay for and pass the Hazard Perception Test (if required).

Evidence of identity

When applying for, renewing or seeking a replacement for a lost, stolen, destroyed or damaged licence, if you are unable to present a Queensland licence that is current or expired less than 2 years ago, you will need to comply with the identity requirements.

These requirements may be met if you can present your Queensland industry authority, marine licence indicator or adult proof of age card (conditions apply).

If you want your changed name shown on your licence, you must show an official change of name document.

Evidence of identity documents

You will need to show 3 evidence of identity documents. They can include either 1 category A and 2 category B documents or 2 category A and 1 category B documents.

Documents must be originals and current unless stated. At least one must include your signature. The Department of Transport and Main Roads may keep a copy of or information about your documents to verify them. Any documents in a foreign language must be accompanied by a recognised English translation. If you cannot produce identity documents, you should consult Department of Transport and Main Roads staff.

Category A documents

These establish the legal existence of your name and date of birth (not a full list):

  • Australian birth certificate – full, including a bicentennial birth certificate issued for births in 1988 (other commemorative certificates, extracts, acknowledgment of birth, photocopies or certified copies of originals are not acceptable)
  • Australian or foreign passport (current or expired less than 2 years)
  • Australian citizenship certificate or naturalisation certificate
  • Department of Immigration and Border Protection travel document (valid up to 5 years after issue)
  • Australian photo driver licence (current or expired less than 2 years)
  • Department of Immigration and Border Protection Certificate of Evidence of Resident Status
  • Queensland or Australian federal police officer photo identity card
  • Queensland Card 18+ (issued after 1 January 1992)
  • Queensland Accreditation (laminate) - for example driver or rider trainer, pilot or escort vehicle driver, dangerous goods driver, tow truck driver and assistant certificate (current or expired less than 2 years)
  • Queensland Driver Authorisation (laminate) - for example bus, taxi or limousine driver (current or expired less than 2 years)

Category B documents

These documents establish the use of your name in the community, they include:

  • Australian Medicare card
  • Australian Defence Force photo identity card (excluding civilians)
  • financial institution debit/credit card with signature and embossed name
  • education institution student identity document (must be issued in Australia and include photo or signature)
  • Department of Veterans’ Affairs/Centrelink pensioner or health care card
  • Australian security guard or crowd controller licence (with photo)
  • Australian firearm licence (with photo)

Change of name documents

If you have changed your name, or your name is different on the documents to be shown, you must also show an official change of name document such as:

  • Australian marriage certificate issued by the relevant Registrar of Births, Deaths and Marriages (ceremonial certificates are not acceptable)
  • Australian change of name certificate issued by the relevant Registrar of Births, Deaths and Marriages
  • Australian civil partnership/relationship certificate
  • Australian birth certificate (amended or with notations)
  • divorce papers decree nisi or absolute (must show the name being reverted to)
  • deed poll (issued before 1 February 2004)

An official overseas marriage certificate may only be accepted if it has a registration number and official crest and is accompanied by 1 category A document or 2 category B documents in your married name.

Evidence of Queensland residential address

If your current Queensland residential address is not shown on either the category A or category B documents, you will need to show another document that provides evidence of your Queensland residential address. They include:

  • contract of purchase, lease or rental document, mortgage or land ownership certificate
  • Queensland vehicle registration certificate
  • Queensland licence or vehicle registration notice (for the coming period)
  • Queensland local government rates notice
  • Queensland land tax valuation notice
  • Australian Taxation Office assessment (last or current financial year)
  • Australian Taxation Office tax file number confirmation (valid up to 2 years)
  • electricity, gas or telephone account

If providing documentation from the Australian Taxation Office, black out all personal information other than your name and residential address (e.g. tax file number).

Eyesight

If you need to wear glasses or contact lenses when driving, your licence will show an ‘S’ code. If you have sight problems, you may be required to obtain a medical certificate to certify that your sight meets the standard for the class of licence you want. If you only have vision in one eye, you will be required to obtain a medical certificate confirming the extent of the loss of visual acuity and fields (whether you are a private or commercial driver). If you do not meet the standards, you will not be granted a licence.

Medical conditions and driving

You must tell the Department of Transport and Main Roads about any long term or permanent medical condition that may affect your ability to drive safely. If you already hold a licence you can complete a Medical Condition Notification (form F4355). Fines in excess of $6,600 and temporary disqualification applies for failing to notify the Department of Transport and Main Roads about a relevant medical condition.

If you have a relevant medical condition you must present a Medical Certificate for Motor Vehicle Driver (form F3712) completed by your doctor. To apply for or to continue to hold a licence your doctor must recommend that you are either:

  • fit to drive with no conditions, or
  • fit to drive with stated conditions (e.g. daylight driving or automatic transmission)

Common medical conditions that may affect your ability to drive safely include:

  • alcohol and/or drug dependency
  • Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias
  • arthritis and other joint diabetes (early and late onset)
  • eye problems (e.g. cataracts)
  • diabetes
  • epilepsy
  • hearing problems
  • heart disease
  • injuries and disabilities
  • loss or partial loss of a limb
  • lung disease
  • psychiatric conditions
  • sleep disorders
  • stroke

If you have a medical condition the code ‘M’ will be recorded on your licence. When you drive you must carry a current medical certificate, obey stated conditions and show it to a police officer if asked. Fines in excess of $2,200 apply for breaking this law.

If you can only drive a specially modified vehicle, you may also be required to carry a current written notice authorising you to drive a vehicle with specialised equipment.

If you drive vehicles with a GVM of more than 8t, public passenger vehicles (e.g. buses or taxis) or vehicles carrying dangerous goods, you must meet the commercial vehicle driver medical standards.

If you are 75 or older

You will be required to present a current medical certificate recommending that you are fit to drive to the Department of Transport and Main Roads when you apply for or renew a licence. You must always carry your medical certificate and obey any stated conditions. Normal requirements about the notification of medical conditions still apply.

From 1 January 2014, medical certificates issued to drivers 75 or older will be valid for a maximum of 12 months.

Road rules test

When you apply for your learner licence you must take the written road rules test at a driver licence issuing centre. If you apply for an additional licence class, you may need to pass a specific test for that class. Allow at least 30 minutes to complete your test.

If you fail, you must wait until the next working day to make another attempt. You must pay the test fee for each attempt. If you pass, the result is valid for 5 years.

You can take the motorcycle road rules test online (a fee is only charged if you pass).

Class C general road rules test

There are 30 multiple-choice questions in the general road rules test. The first section is 10 questions on the give way rules (requires 9 correct answers). The second section is 20 questions on the other road rules (requires 18 correct answers).

Class RE or R (motorcycle) road rules test

You will have to correctly answer at least 27 of the 30 additional multiple-choice questions specific to motorcycles to pass.

Class LR, MR, HR, HC or MC (heavy vehicle) road rules test

You will have to correctly answer at least 8 of the 10 additional multiple-choice questions specific to heavy vehicles to pass.

Practice test questions

There are practice road rules tests for all licence classes online. These will give you an idea of the areas you need to focus on before you try to pass the road rules test.

Learning to drive

Learner licence conditions

Rules for all class C learner licence holders regardless of age

  • Display L plates on the front and back of your vehicle
  • Keep your licence (or Driver Licence Receipt) with you at all times while driving
  • Drive with a zero (0.00) BAC
  • Be supervised by a person who has held an open licence for that class of vehicle for at least 1 year (not a provisional, probationary, restricted, suspended, cancelled or expired licence). If supervising in a car, they must have a BAC below 0.05. If supervising in a heavy vehicle, they must have a 0.00 BAC.
  • You must hold a learner licence for at least 1 year to be eligible to take a Q-Safe practical driving test. If under 25, passing will qualify you for your P1 licence. If 25 or over, passing will qualify you for your P2 licence.
  • Using a mobile phone is prohibited while driving, including hands-free, loudspeaker and Bluetooth functions. Your driving supervisor and passengers are also restricted from using mobile phones on loudspeaker function.

Rules for class C learner licence holders (under 25 years of age)

  • Complete 100 hours (or equivalent) of supervised on-road driving experience including 10 hours at night, recorded and verified in a logbook.

Rules for class C learner licence holders (25 years of age and over)

  • Learners 25 years of age and over are not required to log 100 hours of driving before taking a Q-Safe practical driving test.
  • All drivers are banned from using a mobile phone held in the hand while driving.

L plates

An L plate measures at least 146mm x 146mm and shows a black ‘L’ on a yellow background. When learning to drive, clearly display L plates at the front and back of the vehicle. When learning to ride a motorcycle, clearly display an L plate at the back of the motorcycle or on the back of a vest worn while riding.

Learner licence 125

You risk a fine if the letter ‘L’ cannot be clearly seen from 20m away.

You can buy L plates or download and print a colour template.

A person driving or riding who is not a learner must not display L plates.

The compulsory Queensland learner logbook

All learner drivers under 25 must gain 100 hours of supervised driving experience (including at least 10 hours night driving) and record them in a Queensland learner logbook. Learner drivers 25 or older do not require the hours but it is recommended they gain a similar amount of experience.

You will receive a logbook with your learner licence. The logbook has information about learning to drive, supervisors and your Q-Safe driving test. You can also record your hours using RACQ’s online logbook at www.learn2go.com.au.

If you need to replace your logbook you will need to:

  • obtain another logbook (fee will apply)
  • re-enter the previously completed driving experience
  • get your supervisor to re-sign your prior driving entries

All driving experience should be recorded as an entry in your logbook, with each entry requiring a supervisor’s signature. When completed, you will need to sign a declaration that the logbook entries are true and correct. Penalties apply to you and your supervisor for falsified logbook information.

You cannot take your Q-Safe practical driving test until your completed logbook has been assessed and passed. This means the information in your logbook is valuable, so you should keep a copy of the pages you’ve completed or keep an online logbook.

Supervising drivers can be a family member, a friend or an accredited driver trainer (professional driving instructor). Driving experience (day or night) with a professional driving instructor is tripled up to a maximum of 10 hours. So if you complete 10 hours with an instructor, 30 hours can be recorded in your logbook.

To reach the 100-hour requirement, you can use a combination of experience recorded in your logbook and experience on a Prior Driving Experience Declaration (form F4450) which must be signed by your supervising driver(s). If you have driving experience in Australia or New Zealand on an Australian or New Zealand learner licence, record that experience on a Prior Driving Experience Declaration (Form F4450). If you have driving experience in a recognised country on a foreign learner licence, record that experience on a Prior Driving Experience Declaration (form F4450) (no more than 50 hours).

At least 50 hours (including the required 10 hours of night driving) must have been gained on Australian roads and recorded in your logbook.

If you are unable to gain 100 hours of supervised experience, you may be eligible for an exemption. If granted, your learner licence must be held for 2 years before sitting your Q-Safe practical driving test.

Mobile phones

Learner licence and P1 licence holders under 25 are banned from using mobile phones at any time while driving (including hands-free, Bluetooth, and loudspeaker functions).

Your supervisor and passengers are banned from using phones on loudspeaker. A learner licence holder under 25 may use a mobile phone only when parked.

Ready to drive – for the learner

While you’re learning with supervision your crash risk is reduced. When you graduate to a provisional licence, your chances of accident involvement increase dramatically. Use your time as a learner to gain as much experience as possible and become a safe and smart driver who doesn’t take unnecessary risk during an already risky activity.

Q-Safe practical driving test

Booking your Q-Safe practical driving test

You can book a Q-Safe practical driving test and pay the fee online. If under 25, you must submit your completed logbook via Australia Post at least 12 business days before your test. The Department of Transport and Main Roads will check your logbook and notify you of your result - it must be approved before your test.

Test vehicles

The standard test vehicle for a class C licence is a registered vehicle (not a motorcycle) less than 4.5t GVM, that carries no more than 12 adults including the driver and can pass a safety check conducted by the test examiner.

To pass the safety check, the vehicle must have:

  • indicators, horn and stop lights that work
  • brakes and tyres in good condition
  • adjustable mirrors and sun visors
  • clean windows able to be opened and shut
  • windscreen and wipers in good condition
  • seatbelts and head restraints fitted to both front seats
  • doors that can be opened from inside and outside with suitable handles
  • closed-in roof (convertibles)

The testing vehicle must be a manual if you are going for a manual licence.

If you are under 25 and do your test in a high-powered vehicle, you will need an open licence holder to drive the vehicle from the testing centre.

Before the Q-Safe practical driving test

Bring your:

  • current licence
  • Driving Test Appointment Sheet (form F3910)
  • Completed Driver Licence Application/Renewal (form F3000), ensuring the ‘Registered operator’s authorisation for test vehicle’ section is signed by the registered operator, allowing the examiner to drive if necessary
  • vehicle (if using your own) with L plates
  • glasses or contact lenses (if needed)
  • P plates for when you pass your practical test and get your provisional licence – red if you are under 25 or green if you are 25 or older

You should arrive at least 10 minutes before your test with all forms complete. A customer service officer must witness your signature on the form. If you’re not ready at the scheduled time, your test may be cancelled and fee forfeited - you must book and pay again. Give at least 2 working days notice if changing or cancelling a test.

Your practical driving test may be cancelled (and fee not refunded) for these reasons:

  • your vehicle is modified (unless the modifications are already approved)
  • your number plate is obscured (such as by a tow bar)
  • your number plate cannot be read from 20m
  • your vehicle does not meet the test vehicles standards or pass the safety check
  • L plates are not displayed on the vehicle
  • the registered operator of the vehicle has not signed the Examiner’s authority to drive test vehicle section on the Driver Licence Application/Renewal or Driving Test Appointment Sheet
  • you failed a driving test for the same class of licence the same day
  • you didn’t sign the declaration on the Driver Licence Application/Renewal
  • you are under 25 and your logbook has not been checked and passed

Your practical driving test fee will not be refunded if:

  • you fail your practical driving test
  • you don’t give 2 working days notice before changing or cancelling your test
  • you cannot take your practical driving test at the scheduled time

During your Q-Safe practical driving test

Practical driving tests for class C licences go for no more than 35 minutes. However, allow an hour for all the required administrative activities.

When you arrive you will be informed about how the test will be conducted. Turn off your phone as soon as you arrive and leave it off for the whole test.

A message from your driving examiner

When you meet your driving examiner they will make the following statements to you before you start your driving test:

Q-Safe is designed to evaluate your ability to drive safely and correctly in different driving situations, which may include a variety of speed zones.

I will be asking you to perform a series of driving tasks throughout your assessment. You will be given clear directions in ample time.

If I don’t give you any specific directions, please follow the road and be directed by road signs, signals and road markings.

If your vehicle is fitted with any driver assist technology, such as park assist or GPS, please ensure that it is switched off for the duration of the test.

Do you have any questions?

The examiner will complete a basic safety check of your vehicle then a pre-drive check, which assesses your knowledge of the vehicle’s controls.

Additional information

  • You must follow the road rules
  • Illegal or unsafe tasks will not be asked of you
  • You must still shoulder/head check even if you have blind spot mirrors
  • The examiner cannot answer questions that may influence your driving
  • The driving examiner may make notes about each task. They are assessing you so don’t assume you have made a mistake.

Q-Safe practical driving test

Pre-drive check

The pre-drive check asks you to locate and explain a range of controls (e.g. headlights, hazard lights, wipers, washers, demister, air conditioner, seat adjustment, and mirrors).

Driving tasks

The driving examiner will check you perform the following correctly:

  • stopping – use of the vehicle’s parking or foot brake when stopped.
  • giving way – slow down or stop and give way to road users so they do not have to take action to avoid your vehicle.
  • obeying all traffic signs, signals and road markings.
  • moving off, changing direction or lane changing – follow this sequence:
    1. look in mirrors
    2. indicate your intention
    3. head check the vehicle’s blind
    4. check traffic, your road position and speed
    5. when beginning to move, check for changed traffic conditions
  • ensuring a smooth take-up of power and gear changing; no clutch coasting.
  • using gears appropriate for speed, vehicle and conditions.
  • avoiding harsh or abrupt movement by slowing smoothly. Use parking brake when stationary.
  • speed – do not speed and drive at a speed that suits conditions.
  • observation and scanning – look left, right, ahead and behind when approaching a hazard. Use a driving ‘system’ to handle hazards.
  • mirrors – check all mirrors frequently.
  • following vehicles – in good conditions, travel at least 2 seconds behind the vehicle in front. Double this gap in poor conditions.
  • marked lanes – keep within lane markings. Change lanes only after signalling and if safe.
  • road position – keep as far left as safe and practical if no marked lanes.
  • signalling and indicators – give other road users sufficient warning.
  • steering – always keep control of the steering wheel. Never:
    • put your hands inside the rim
    • remove your hands or let the wheel ‘go free’
    • hold the wheel with your arms crossed or so the wheel is restricted
    • operate the wheel with one hand unnecessarily
    • palm the wheel
    • operate the wheel while stationary (‘dry’ steering)
  • manoeuvres (classes C or CA) – perform two of the listed manoeuvres (at least one with a reversing component):
    • reverse park the vehicle parallel to and within 45cm of the kerb. You have 1 attempt with a maximum of 2 reverse and 1 forward movements
    • reverse – steer a steady course (in an approximately straight line), starting and finishing within 50cm of the kerb. Observation should be predominantly looking through the rear window (not using a mirror)
    • turn around – within the width of a street, turn the car around with a minimum number of forward and reverse movements.
    • U-turn – give way to all other road users and have a clear view of all traffic
    • hill start – position the car parallel to and within 50cm of the kerb and move off without rolling back
    • gear-changing in automatic vehicles – you may be asked to select a lower gear and re-select ‘drive’

After the Q-Safe practical driving test

After all tasks are complete you will be directed to the testing office. You will be informed if you have passed or failed. Feedback on errors and a copy of your Driving Assessment Report is provided. If you have passed, you pay the licence fee and you may have your photo taken. You then get a P1 licence if you are under 25, or a P2 licence if you are 25 or older. Not displaying the correct new plates risks a fine. If you are upgrading your licence, it will be re-issued with the new licence class stated on it.

If you failed, don’t panic

Make sure you know what you did wrong and how to improve. Practice and try again. The test can be taken as many times as necessary, but you must pay each time. You can’t re-take the test until your cooling off period is over. The cooling off periods are:

First fail - you may re-sit the test on the next day.

Second fail - you may re-sit the test after 8 days.

Third and subsequent fail - you may re-sit the test after 29 days.

Provisional licences

After passing the practical driving test, if you are under 25 you will get a P1 provisional licence. If you are 25 or older, you will get a P2 provisional licence.

P1 provisional licence requirements

If you hold a P1 provisional licence and you are under 25, you:

  • must display red P plates at the front and back of your car when driving
  • must not use your mobile when driving, including hands-free and Bluetooth. You and your passengers are also banned from using the loudspeaker function
  • are not allowed to have more than 1 passenger aged under 21 in the car with you between 11pm and 5am, unless they’re members of your immediate family
  • are not allowed to drive high-powered vehicles
  • must drive with a zero BAC
  • must carry your licence (or Driver Licence Receipt) when driving

If you turn 25 when on your P1 licence the peer passenger, high-powered vehicle and additional mobile phone restrictions no longer apply. You must continue to display red P Plates, drive with a zero BAC and carry your licence or Driver Licence Receipt.

Getting your P2 licence

If you hold a P1 licence, to get your P2 licence you will need to:

  • be at least 18
  • hold your P1 licence for at least 1 year (excluding suspensions or cancellations)
  • obtain green P plates
  • pay for and pass the Hazard Perception Test

If you are eligible for a P2 licence it will automatically be mailed to you.

Hazard Perception Test

To graduate to a P2 or open licence, P1 licence holders must pass an additional Hazard Perception Test that complements the road rules and practical driving tests.

The Hazard Perception Test is an online computer-based test that measures a driver’s ability to recognise and appropriately respond to hazards. These hazards include situations where your vehicle is on course to hit another road user and you need to slow down or change course to prevent a crash (termed 'traffic conflict').

The test is only available online at www.qld.gov.au (not at licence issuing centres).

Once you have passed the hazard perception test, you will not be required to sit this test again. Simply pay the required fee and you will be eligible to upgrade once you have held your P1 licence for 12 months.

P2 provisional licence requirements

If you hold a P2 provisional licence you must:

  • display green P plates at the front and back of your vehicle when driving
  • drive with a zero BAC
  • carry your licence (or Driver Licence Receipt) when driving
  • not drive high-powered vehicles (if under 25)

Provisional licence issued before 1 July 2007

If you obtained your provisional licence before 1 July 2007, you must:

  • drive with a zero BAC
  • always carry your licence when you are driving

P plates

P plates remind inexperienced drivers they are are still developing during their first year (during which they are at the the greatest risk of crashing). They also help other road users identify inexperienced drivers so they can exercise caution.

A P plate measures at least 146mm x 146mm and features an upper- case red or green ‘P’ on a white background. You can buy P plates from service stations, major retailers and automotive outlets. You can also download and print plates from  www.qld.gov.au. If you are a P1 or P2 licence holder, you must not use a vehicle unless a P plate can clearly be seen from the front and back of the car or the back of the motorcycle.

provisional p1 red p plate 125   provisional p2 green p plate 125

High-powered vehicles

You are not allowed to drive a high-powered vehicle if you:

  • hold a P1 or P2 provisional licence and are under 25
  • are returning from a disqualification and were under 25 at the time of the offence – you will get a P1 or P2 probationary licence

Vehicles manufactured after 1 January 2010

For vehicles manufactured on or after 1 January 2010 a 'high-powered' vehicle is any car with a power to weight ratio of more than 130 kilowatts per tonne.

The power to weight ratio of a vehicle is calculated by dividing the vehicle’s maximum engine power (kW) by the tare weight (kg) and multiplying by 1000. For example, the power-to-weight ratio of a vehicle with maximum engine power of 195kW and tare weight of 1667kg would be: (195 ÷ 1667) x 1000 = 117kW/tonne.

Vehicles manufactured before 1 January 2010

For vehicles manufactured before 1 January 2010 a 'high-powered' vehicle is any car that has at least one of the following:

  • 8 or more cylinders
  • a supercharged or turbocharged engine that is not diesel powered
  • an engine that has a power output of more than 210kW under the manufacturer’s specifications for the car
  • a rotary engine that has an engine capacity of more than 1146cc under the manufacturer’s specifications for the car
  • a modification to the engine of any kind that must be approved under the Transport Operations Regulation 2010, section 13

The Department of Transport and Main Roads website provides an online service so that you can check whether or not a vehicle is a high-powered vehicle. You may request an exemption that is considered on a case-by-case basis in accordance with strict guidelines. A fine and 3 demerit points apply for breaching this restriction.

Mobile phones

All drivers are banned from using a mobile phone held in the hand while driving. You will get a fine and 3 demerit points. If you’re a learner or P1 licence holder under 25 you are further banned from using hands-free, Bluetooth, and loudspeaker functions.

If you’re under 25, and a P1 licence holder, your passengers are also banned from using a mobile phone on loudspeaker.

Peer passengers

The risk of a crash is higher when a young driver is carrying more than 1 passenger of a similar age. If under 25 you’re not allowed to have more than 1 passenger under 21 in the car with you between the hours of 11pm-5am, unless they’re members of your immediate family. A fine and 3 demerit points apply for breaching this restriction.

Demerit points

If you hold a provisional licence and accumulate 4 or more demerit points over a 1-year period, you must choose between a 3 month driving suspension or a 1-year good driving behaviour period. If you are under 25, further restrictions will be imposed during the good driving behaviour period or when you resume driving after the suspension.

If your licence is expired, suspended, or you are disqualified by a court from holding or obtaining a licence during the provisional licence period, this time doesn’t contribute to the minimum time you must hold that licence.

Open licences

You may be eligible for an open licence if you are at least 20 and you have held your P1 or P2 licence for the required period:

  • If you were under 23 when you got your P1 licence you must hold your P2 licence for at least 2 years to progress to an open licence.
  • If you were 23 when you got your P1 licence you must hold your P2 licence for at least 1 year to progress to an open licence.
  • If you were 24 when you got your P1 licence you must hold your P1 licence for at least 1 year to progress to an open licence.
  • If you were 25 or over when you passed your practical test, you would’ve been issued with a P2 licence which you must hold for at least 1 year. To graduate to an open licence you are not required to take the Hazard Perception Test.

Conditions for open licence holders

  • Remove any P plates.
  • It is recommended that you always carry your licence when driving. If driving a heavy vehicle, you must carry your licence (or Driver Licence Receipt).
  • Drive with a BAC below 0.05 (0.00 for interlock and heavy vehicle drivers).

Demerit points

If you accumulate 12 or more demerit points over a 3-year period you must choose between a 3 month driving suspension or a 1-year good driving behaviour period.

Probationary and restricted licences

Probationary licences

If you have served a period of disqualification, a probationary licence will be issued.

If you held a P1 or P2 licence when disqualified, you will get a P1 or P2 probationary licence for at least 1 year and comply with the applicable conditions.

If you held a P provisional licence (issued before 1 July 2007) or an open licence before you were disqualified, you will get a P probationary licence for at least 1 year.

Conditions for probationary licence holders

You must:

  • hold the probationary licence for at least 1 year
  • carry your licence (or Driver Licence Receipt) when driving
  • have a zero BAC when driving
  • comply with a late night driving restriction prohibiting you from driving between 11pm and 5am (if you held a P1 or P2 licence and were under 25 at the time of committing the offence that resulted in your disqualification)

You may:

  • drive any class of vehicle your licence allows
  • learn to drive a higher class vehicle as long as you are with someone who holds and has held an open licence for that class for at least 1 year

High-powered vehicle restrictions apply to probationary licence holders who return from a disqualification to a P1 or P2 probationary licence, and were under 25 at the time of the offence. The restrictions apply for the full probationary period regardless of age.

Restricted licences

If convicted of drink or drug driving offences, you can ask the court for a restricted ‘work’ licence before your disqualification is imposed. To be eligible you must prove you will not pose a risk to other road users and need a licence to earn your living. You are not eligible to apply for a restricted licence if:

  • you did not hold a Queensland open licence when you committed, and were convicted of, the offence
  • you were driving a vehicle you were not authorised to drive under your open licence when you committed the offence
  • when tested, your BAC was 0.15 or greater
  • when you committed the offence you were using the vehicle in an activity directly connected with earning your living
  • at the time of the offence you were driving a truck, tractor, specially constructed vehicle, bus, articulated vehicle, B-double, road train, taxi, limousine, tow truck, pilot or escort vehicle for an oversize vehicle, a vehicle carrying a load of dangerous goods or being used by a driver trainer to give driver training
  • in the past 5 years, your licence has been suspended or cancelled, or you have been disqualified from holding or obtaining a licence
  • you have been convicted of drink, drug or dangerous driving in the past 5 years

Conditions for restricted licence holders

You must:

  • carry your licence (or Driver Licence Receipt) and court order when driving.
  • comply with the court order conditions.
  • have a zero BAC when driving.

Motorcycles

Class RE

To be eligible for a class RE motorcycle learner licence, you must have held a provisional, probationary or open licence for another class of vehicle for at least 1 of the past 5 years.

All levels of Class RE licence holders are only able to ride a learner approved motorcycle - a production motorcycle fitted with an electric motor, or an internal combustion engine with a capacity of no more than 660 mL, and:

  • has a power to weight ratio of no more than 150kW/tonne
  • has not been modified other than allowable
  • is stated to be a learner approved motorcycle in a list published on the Department of Transport and Main Roads website

To help identify motorcycles allowed under a class RE licence, an indicator is included on the vehicle registration notice and registration certificate.

Q-Ride

To get a class RE provisional or open licence you must pass a Q-Ride course (a competency-based training course provided by registered service providers). You can enrol as soon as you are issued a learner licence. Q-Ride is mandatory if you live within a 100km radius of a Q-Ride registered service provider. During the Q-Ride course you must demonstrate your competency in riding a learner-approved motorcycle.

Q-Safe

If you live outside a 100km radius of a Q-Ride provider, you have the option of completing a Q-Safe practical riding test. If you are eligible to undertake a Q-Safe test, you need to have held your class RE learner licence for a minimum period of 6 months. Once you have undertaken and passed a Q-Ride course or a Q-Safe test, you may apply for a class RE provisional, probationary or open type licence.

Class R

You must have held your class RE provisional, probationary or open licence for at least 1 year before learning to ride a class R motorcycle. If you live within a 100km radius of a Q-Ride provider, you must complete a Q-Ride course. Otherwise, you must complete a Q-Safe practical riding test. A class R licence allows you to ride a motorcycle of any engine capacity including a learner approved motorcycle and a moped.

Pillion passenger restriction for learner riders

Class RE and R learner licence holders cannot carry pillion passengers (including supervisors) when learning. A supervisor may be seated in a sidecar. If not, the supervisor may follow at a safe distance on another motorcycle or in another vehicle.

P plates on motorcycles

If you hold a P1 or P2 licence, you will need to clearly display a red or green P plate on the back of your vehicle when riding. If you hold an open licence when you get your class RE or R licence, you will not need to display a P plate when riding.

Conditions for learning to ride a class RE motorcycle

You must:

  • obey the conditions that apply to your licence
  • always carry your licence (or Driver Licence Receipt) when learning to ride
  • be supervised by a person who holds and has held an open class RE or class R licence for at least 1 year (supervisor’s licence must be the same as the class of motorcycle you are learning to ride)
  • only learn to ride a learner approved motorcycle (on class RE learner licence)
  • always display an L plate on the back of the motorcycle or on the back of a vest
  • have a zero BAC on your class RE learner licence
  • not carry a pillion passenger while learning to ride

Your first motorcycle licence (class RE) allows you to ride a learner-approved motorcycle.

If you hold a P1 or P2 car licence, you must display the appropriate P plate on the back of your motorcycle. During the first year of holding your class RE licence, you must:

  • have a zero (0.00) BAC (even if you hold an open licence)
  • not carry a pillion passenger

Upgrading to a Class R motorcycle licence

  • You are able to learn to ride a class R motorcycle after you have held your class RE licence for at least 1 year.
  • Display an L plate on the back of the motorcycle or on the back of a vest worn by you while learning.
  • Do not carry a pillion passenger, including a supervisor.
  • You must be accompanied by a supervisor with an appropriate licence, in a sidecar, on another motorcycle or vehicle, while learning to ride on the road.
  • Always ride with a zero BAC while learning.
  • Always carry your licence (or Driver Licence Receipt) when learning.

The learner approved motorcycle scheme restrictions don’t apply to a class R licence.

Special rules about mopeds

If you have a class C learner licence and you want to learn to ride a moped, you must:

  • always carry your licence (or Driver Licence Receipt) when learning
  • be accompanied by, or ride under the direction of, a person who holds and has held an class C, RE or R open licence for at least 1 year
  • always wear a motorcycle helmet that meets the Australian Standard AS1698 or United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (ECE) 22.05 standard

Only hours driving a car may be recorded as supervised driving experience (moped hours don’t count towards the 100 hours). You cannot take a driving test on a moped (it doesn’t represent the class of vehicle applicable to the class C or RE licence).

You cannot carry a pillion passenger on a moped unless the seating capacity allows two people and you hold and have held a class RE or R licence for at least 1 year.

A moped rider with a class C, RE or R open licence may lane filter and ride on road shoulders or in emergency stopping lanes under certain conditions when safe.

If you hold a class C, RE or R provisional, probationary or open licence, you are authorised to ride a moped without supervision.

The Q-Ride method

Q-Ride is a competency-based training program that improves the quality of rider instruction by ensuring participants train until they are competent against set standards. Q-Ride providers are accredited by the Department of Transport and Main Roads.

Eligibility

You can sign up for Q-Ride to get your class RE provisional or open licence when you get your class RE learner licence. You can sign up for Q-Ride to get your class R licence after you have held your class RE provisional or open licence for 1 year.

Applying for Q-Ride training and assessment

To get your motorcycle licence (class RE or R) with Q-Ride, follow these steps.

  1. Get started – you need to hold a class RE learner licence to learn to ride a class RE motorcycle. To learn to ride a class R motorcycle, you must have held a class RE provisional, probationary or open licence for at least 1 year.
  2. Choose – a Q-Ride registered service provider.
  3. Enrol – in Q-Ride training with this provider who will ask about your licence history to determine the motorcycle class you are eligible to learn to ride.
  4. Learn – develop your motorcycle riding skills through training. Always carry your class RE licence. Only receive instruction from another rider who holds and has held for at least 1 year an open licence for the class of motorcycle you are riding.
  5. Certificate – when assessed as attaining the required competencies by an accredited trainer, the Q-Ride registered service provider will issue you with a competency declaration (Q-Ride certificate).
  6. Licence – take your Q-Ride certificate and licence into a Department of Transport and Main Roads centre to apply for your class RE or R licence.

Q-Safe practical driving test

Q-Safe is a practical riding test conducted by the Department of Transport and Main Roads. You are only eligible to take a Q-Safe test for a class RE or R licence if you live 100km or more from a registered Q-Ride service provider.

Test vehicles

For a Q-Safe test you must ride a standard test vehicle for the class of licence. You cannot take a test on a moped, conditionally registered motorcycle, motorcycle with a sidecar attached or motortrike.

Licence class Vehicle requirement
RE (motorcycle) A learner approved motorcycle
R (motorcycle) A motorcycle not stated on the learner approved motorcycle list

 
The vehicle must be registered and pass a basic safety check:

  • signalling devices, horn and stop lights work
  • brakes and tyres are in good condition
  • mirrors are adjustable

If you hold a P1 (red) or P2 (green) licence, bring your P plate to attach to your motorcycle after you pass.

Clothing requirements

The following clothing is recommended for the motorcycle test:

  • pants (heavy material) that cover the leg length
  • long-sleeved shirt or jacket (heavy material)
  • gloves providing appropriate protection
  • fully enclosed shoes or boots
  • eye protection

You must wear a motorcycle helmet that meets the Australian Standard AS1698 or United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (ECE) 22.05 standard.

A message from your riding examiner

The examiner will make the following statements before starting your test.

Q-Safe is designed to evaluate your ability to ride safely and correctly in different situations, which may include a variety of speed zones.

I will be asking you to undertake a series of riding tasks throughout the assessment. You will be given clear directions in ample time.

I will follow you during the riding assessment. Please keep me in your vision and, should we get separated during the assessment, please stop somewhere safe and legal and wait for me.

You will be given clear instructions in ample time by radio.

If radio reception of directions given becomes unclear, pull over somewhere safe and legal and I will give you further instruction.

You will be expected to perform the riding tasks when conditions are safe and in accordance with the road rules.

Please make any lane changes that are necessary to follow my direction.

At no time will I ask you to perform any illegal riding tasks.

Once the assessment has commenced, I am unable to answer any questions that may influence your riding performance.

Do you have any questions?

Pre-ride check

The pre-ride check will begin the test and involve the riding examiner asking you to locate and explain a range of vehicle controls including the operation of the fuel reserve, choke, kill switch, side stand, horn and headlight/dip switch.

Riding tasks

The class RE and R practical riding tests will go for 35 minutes and include general riding exercises and low speed manoeuvres. The examiner will check you perform the following procedures correctly:

  • changing road position – give other road users sufficient warning of your intention and always check mirrors and blind spot before changing your position
  • posture when riding, keep your:
    • knees into the tank
    • head up so you are looking well ahead through corners
    • foot instep on the footrest
    • feet out, slightly down and on the footrests except when stopping or moving off
  • gear changing – avoid wheel lock-up by smooth gear changes. A touch to the accelerator on down changes is recommended.
  • balance and control – maintain full balance and control in all conditions
  • road position – keep clear of painted surfaces and metal inspection covers. Beware of oily or loose surfaces, especially near intersections. Positioning must be suitable for the conditions (including enhancing safety when there are no line markings). Keep within marked lanes.
  • required manoeuvres:
    • slow ride – ride in a straight line at the speed of a slow walk using the clutch if necessary to adjust the speed
    • U-turns – give way to all other road users and have a clear view of all approaching traffic
    • emergency stop – stop safely with full control from a speed of no more than 40km/h. Use all fingers on the front brake. Don’t lock the wheels. Changing back through gears is not required in this exercise
    • hill start – move off smoothly from a stationary position and travel up a moderate incline without rolling backwards

Additional road rules for motorcycle riders

Motorcycle riders are subject to normal road rules and the following additional rules:

  • Wear a securely fastened, approved motorcycle helmet other than when parked.
  • Display the appropriate plate on the back of the motorcycle or a vest.
  • You must be astride the rider’s seat.
  • To carry a passenger you must have held your provisional, probationary or open motorcycle licence for that class of motorcycle for at least 1 year.
  • You may ride side-by-side with another motorcycle rider in 1 marked lane when you are no more than 1.5m apart.
  • You may enter a bicycle storage area as long as you give way to cyclists or other motorcycle riders.
  • If you hold an open licence for riding a motorcycle, you may lane filter by moving between stationary or slow moving vehicles travelling in the same direction, provided you do not exceed 30km/h and it is safe. Lane filtering is prohibited in school zones during school zone hours.
  • If you hold an open licence for riding a motorcycle, on major roads where the speed limit is 90km/h or higher you may ride at speeds not greater than 30km/h on a road shoulder or in an emergency stopping lane, as long as it is safe.

Rules for carrying passengers on any motorcycle

  • No pillion passengers when learning a class RE or R motorcycle and during the first year of holding a RE or R licence.
  • Each passenger must wear a securely fastened, approved helmet.
  • Carry only the number of passengers a sidecar was designed for.
  • A pillion passenger must be on the pillion seat facing forwards. They must be 8 or older and their feet must reach the passenger footrests while seated.
  • A passenger must be on the pillion seat safely or in a sidecar.
  • A passenger must not ride unless there is a suitable pillion seat and footrests.
  • Passengers must not interfere with effective control of the motorcycle.

Parking

A parked motorcycle or moped should have at least one wheel as close as possible to the kerb. Park a motorcycle with a sidecar parallel to the kerb.

Preparing to get on the road

You and any passengers must wear a helmet that meets the Australian Standard AS1698 or the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (ECE) 22.05 standard when riding. It should fit properly and be in good condition.

For safety, it is recommended that riders and passengers wear eye protection, gloves, boots, and hardwearing, high-visibility clothing, covering legs and arms.

To increase visibility and safety you should ride with the headlight on at all times.

Before riding, check the following are working:

  • headlight
  • rear red reflector
  • front and rear brakes
  • muffler
  • horn
  • rear number plate light (clear)
  • rear and brake light that shows a red light
  • footrests for you and for your pillion passenger (if registered to carry a pillion)
  • chain guard (must be fitted if chain driven)
  • chain (correctly adjusted and lightly lubricated)
  • right and left rear-vision mirrors (optional if manufactured before June 1975)
  • safe tyres (tread at least 1.5mm deep)
  • indicators (if manufactured after 1962)

If you are an employee, contractor or sub-contractor with Australia Post, you may ride on a footpath or road reserve if:

  • you are delivering post
  • the motorcycle engine is not more than 125mL
  • your speed is no more than 10km/h
  • you ride safely, taking care to avoid danger or a crash

Heavy vehicles

To obtain a Heavy Vehicle Licence you must pass a practical driving test.

Test vehicles

There are standard test vehicles for each class of licence.

Licence class Vehicle requirement
LR (light rigid) A bus or truck more than 4.5t GVM but no more than 8t GVM.
MR (medium rigid) A bus or truck more than 8t GVM with no more than 2 axles.
HR (heavy rigid) A bus or a truck more than 15t GVM with at least 3 axles.
Note: The test cannot be taken in a bobtail prime mover.
HC (heavy combination) A prime mover more than 15t GVM with at least 3 axles and semi-trailer with at least 2 axles.
A truck more than 15t GVM with at least 3 axles and trailer more than 9t GVM with at least 2 axles.

 
A vehicle of more than 12t GVM must be equipped with at least 3 portable warning triangles for the test.

Practical driving test times

The duration of driving tests for the heavy vehicle classes are:

LR = 25-35 minutes

MR and HR = 60-70 minutes

HC = 70-80 minutes

Q-Safe practical driving test

During a heavy vehicle practical driving test, you will also be assessed on these tasks.

Pre-drive check

You will be asked to locate and explain a range of controls including wipers, washers, demister, air conditioner, seat adjustment, hazard lights, mirrors, horn and headlights.

Practical driving test

The driving examiner will check you perform the following correctly:

  • reversing exercise – reverse the vehicle around a corner in a left- or right-hand direction, starting and finishing parallel to and within 2m of the kerb. You will be allowed 2 attempts, each with 2 reverse movements and 1 forward movement allowed. The forward movement for left and right reversing can be as far as the furthest edge or kerb from which you are turning. You should check in your mirrors and can glance over your shoulder occasionally. If your test vehicle has a dog trailer, you may reverse with or without the trailer steerable axle locked.
  • gear changing – change down gear, excluding crawler gears, when the vehicle is in motion. On a manual vehicle, use the clutch. You must be able to operate exhaust brakes, two-speed differential, range selector and so on (if fitted)
  • hill start – move off smoothly on a moderate incline without rolling backwards
  • uncouple/recouple requirements – for the class HC, uncouple the trailer, drive forward approximately 10m and reverse back onto the trailer to recouple, following all safe practices in the correct sequence, within 12 minutes (extra time may be given for some configurations e.g. flying saucer type coupling)

Correct sequence and procedure – uncouple

  1. Apply the park brake.
  2. Alight from the cab, facing the vehicle.
  3. Secure the wheel chocks (necessary if no spring brake system).
  4. Lower trailer/drawbar support legs.
  5. Disconnect, retract and secure:
    • electric cable
    • hydraulic lines
    • brake hoses
    • chains (where applicable)
  6. Release the turntable jaws/pin coupling.
  7. Where the vehicle has airbag suspension, operate the air dump valve (where applicable) to prevent damage.
  8. Drive prime mover or truck forward for a distance of approximately 10m.

Correct sequence and procedure – recouple

  1. Ensure pin coupling/jaws are in the correct position for recoupling.
  2. Reverse prime mover/truck. You can stop and check your position in relation to the trailer coupling. Activate valve to refill airbag suspension (where applicable).
  3. After you have coupled, check all the mechanisms are locked by:
    • attempting to ease forward against the trailer brakes (tug test)
    • visually checking the coupling to ensure locking pin/jaws have engaged after applying the park brake.
  4. Connect and check the condition of:
    • brake hoses
    • hydraulic lines
    • electric cables
    • ensure chains are crossed (if applicable)
  5. Wind up trailer support legs and lock in position or secure drawbar leg.
  6. Start engine and build up air pressure to operating level.
  7. Turn the engine off and walk around the vehicle listening for air leaks, checking the condition of all tyres.
  8. Remove wheel chocks (if appropriate).
  9. Check trailer and footbrake stop lights, turn indicators and sound the horn (ensures correct functioning of the electrical system).
  10. An additional tug test should be conducted on the trailer brake at low speed after recoupling when asked to do so by the driving examiner.

A practical driving test is not required for a class MC licence.

If you currently hold a class HR licence you must complete Drive Multi-Combination Vehicle approved training course (TLIC4006A) through an approved training provider.

If you hold a class HC licence you must either complete a Drive Multi-Combination Vehicle approved training course (TLIC4006A) or complete a Multi-Combination Driving Experience Declaration form and provide evidence you have 50 hours of class MC driving experience within a 6 month period.

Long vehicle

You should know the length and height of your long vehicle and your obligations regarding turning, following distance and giving way.

Synchromesh restriction code

If the driving test is conducted in a synchromesh transmission vehicle and non-synchromesh skills have not been displayed in a previous test, a licence condition code B (synchromesh restricted) will be stated on the licence.

General provisions

Renewing your licence

To apply for, or renew, your licence, visit a licence-issuing centre. If you hold a provisional, probationary or open licence, you may renew your licence online.

Renewal can take place up to 6 weeks before expiration without reducing the licence period (up to 5 years). You will need to pay a fee when renewing.

If expired, you may have to show extra identification when renewing. If renewing within 5 years of the expiry date, you will not be required to take another practical driving test. If found driving with an expired licence, you may be charged with unlicensed driving.

Travelling interstate or overseas

If driving interstate, you still need to comply with the conditions of your licence. You must also comply with the road rules in the other state or territory. Prior to travelling, check with the relevant transport authority for specific rules that may affect you.

If your licence expires while interstate or overseas, and you still need to drive before returning to Queensland, contact the Department of Transport and Main Roads.

Changing your name or address

If you change your name or address, you must tell the Department of Transport and Main Roads within 14 days (can be done online).

Non-Queensland driver licences

Interstate licence

An interstate driver licence is one granted in another Australian state or territory.

Foreign licence

A foreign driver licence is one issued to you under a law of another country.

Driving in Queensland

When you may drive in Queensland

A valid interstate or foreign licence allows you to drive any class of vehicle that licence allows you to drive, as long as you comply with the licence conditions.

When you are driving, you must have the licence with you.

If your licence is not in English, you should carry a recognised English translation when driving (see www.naati.com.au for a list of recognised translators).

When you must not drive in Queensland

You must not drive in Queensland on your interstate or foreign licence if:

  • your licence is not valid because it has expired or been suspended or cancelled
  • an Australian court has disqualified you from holding or obtaining a licence
  • your authority to drive in Queensland on your interstate or foreign licence has been suspended because:
    • you have been convicted of driving more than 40km/h over the limit
    • you have not paid fines
    • you have accumulated too many demerit points
  • your authority to drive in Queensland has been withdrawn because:
    • you have a medical condition that affects your driving
    • the 3 months residency rule applies to you

When the 3 months residency rule applies

Under the 3 months residency rule, you must obtain a Queensland driver licence if:

  • you are an Australian citizen who has been residing in Queensland for 3 months
  • you are not an Australian citizen, and you have been residing in Queensland for 3 months since getting a permanent visa or special category visa under the Migration Act 1958 (Commonwealth)

Permanent visa and special category visa

A permanent visa and a special category visa allow you to stay in Australia indefinitely. Other visas (e.g. student) that allow you to stay for a limited time, until a certain event or while you have a special status, are not permanent or special category visas.

If you need to drive in Queensland

If your licence has expired or your authority to drive has been withdrawn because of the 3 months residency rule, you may be eligible to be granted a Queensland driver licence.

Obtaining a Queensland driver licence

If you hold an interstate licence and need to get a Queensland licence for the same class, you will need to:

  • show your interstate licence and supporting evidence of identity documents
  • show evidence of your Queensland residence
  • surrender your interstate licence

You may also be required to show evidence that you are medically fit to drive.

If you hold a foreign licence and need to get a Queensland licence for the same class, you will need to:

  • show your foreign licence and a recognised translation (if is not in English)
  • show supporting evidence of identity documents
  • show evidence of your Queensland residence
  • pay a fee

You may also be required to:

  • show evidence that you are medically fit to drive
  • pay for and pass the road rules test
  • pay for and pass the practical driving test
  • have your photo and signature taken digitally

If you have difficulty in understanding or speaking English, an approved interpreter may assist you while you take your road rules test.

You must not continue to drive in Queensland on your interstate or foreign licence once a Queensland licence is granted.

If any of the following happens, you will not be eligible to be granted a Queensland driver licence until the period of suspension or disqualification has ended:

  • your licence has been suspended
  • an Australian court has disqualified you from holding or obtaining a licence
  • your authority to drive in Queensland has been suspended because you have:
    • been convicted of driving more than 40km/h over the limit
    • not paid fines
    • accumulated too many demerit points

If your authority to drive in Queensland has been withdrawn because you have a medical condition, you will not be eligible for a Queensland licence until your doctor gives you a medical certificate stating that you are medically fit to drive.

 

Continue reading the Your Keys to Driving in Queensland Summary:

1. Introduction

2. Licences

3. Road Rules

4. Safe Road Use

5. Offences and Penalties

6. Your Vehicle

7. Organ Donation


Check out the other QLD Driving Test resources available to help you pass the written road rules test and get your learner licence (L plates):

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